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  #1  
Old 09-12-2008, 01:03 PM
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Taekwondo

I am just starting something new in my life as of my birthday a couple of days ago. I am taking Taekwondo class. My kids have been doing it for a while and another adult was just starting with his daughter so I figured "what the hell?" So, anyone else here do any martial arts? It seems pretty cool and it's great exercise.
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  #2  
Old 09-13-2008, 09:04 AM
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i used to do that and ju jitsu, but i had to quit due to school. was fun though
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  #3  
Old 09-13-2008, 11:24 PM
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I'm 16, been doing Taekwondo for 10/11 years now. I help teach a class two nights a week now.
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  #4  
Old 09-13-2008, 11:30 PM
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one of my friends is a blackbelt in this, he can do some impressive shit, but personally i dont know much about martial arts.

i did watch the bas rutten dvd one time tho
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  #5  
Old 09-14-2008, 01:01 AM
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Tae Kwon Do a very long time ago. Krav Maga more recently.
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  #6  
Old 09-15-2008, 01:09 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by hot_turkey_ed View Post
Krav Maga
That sounds intense.
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  #7  
Old 09-15-2008, 04:28 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Fe Maiden View Post
That sounds intense.
Krav Maga was definitely more intense for me. Our TKD felt more like sports than self-defense, and I don't know how quickly it would have been useful for me in a pinch. My Krav Maga training was a lot more practical, emphasizing doing enough damage quickly so you can escape the fight.

From wikipedia:

Although Krav Maga shares many techniques with other martial arts, the training is often quite different. It stresses fighting under worst-case conditions or from disadvantaged positions, for example: against several opponents, when protecting someone else, with one arm unusable, when dizzy or against armed opponents. Krav Maga emphasizes rapid learning and the retzef ("continuous combat motion"), with the imperative being effectiveness,[3] for either attack or defensive situations.

Instructors emphasize two training rules: (1) there are no rules in a fight and (2) one must not injure oneself or one's partner when training.[3] Training is an intense mixed aerobic and anaerobic workout, relying heavily on the use of pads in order to experience both delivery and defense of strikes at full force. This is important because it allows the student to practice the technique at full strength, and the student holding the pad learns a little of the impact they would feel when they get hit. It can be almost as taxing to hold a pad as to practice against one. Students will also wear head guards, gum shields, groin protectors, shin and forearm guards, etc. during practice of attack/defense techniques, so that a realistic level of violence may be used without injury. Some schools incorporate "Strike and Fight," which consists of full-contact sparring[citation needed] intended to familiarize the student with the stresses of a violent situation.

Training may employ a speaker system blasting loud music, stroboscope and/or fog machine, meant to train the student to ignore peripheral distractions and focus on the needs of the situation.[citation needed] Other training methods to increase realism might include exercising the student to near exhaustion before having to defend, training outdoors on a variety of surfaces and restrictive situations, wearing a blindfold before being attacked, etc. The emphasis is on attempting to simulate real fight/attack situations as realistically as possible within the safety limitations of training.

Training will usually also cover situational awareness, to develop an understanding of one's surroundings and potentially threatening circumstances before an attack is launched. It may also cover "Self Protection": ways to deal with situations which could end in fights, and physical and verbal methods to avoid violence whenever possible.

A typical session in a civilian school is about an hour long and mixes conditioning with self-defense teaching. As levels increase, the instructors focus a little more on complicated and less common types of attacks, such as knife attacks, hostage situations and defense under extreme duress. First, the instructor will run a very intense drill to get the class' heart rates up. Then, after stretching, the instructor will teach two or three self-defense techniques. In the beginning the techniques will either be combative (punches, hammer-fists, elbows, and knees) or grappling (breaking out of chokes or wrist-grabs, getting out from under an opponent while on one's back). After that, the class usually moves to a drill that combines the techniques just taught with an aerobic technique. Finally, there is the final drill intended to burn out the students. Depending on the class - and on the instructor's mood - this drill may be at the very beginning or at the end of the class.
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  #8  
Old 09-16-2008, 11:37 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by hot_turkey_ed View Post
Krav Maga was definitely more intense for me. Our TKD felt more like sports than self-defense, and I don't know how quickly it would have been useful for me in a pinch. My Krav Maga training was a lot more practical, emphasizing doing enough damage quickly so you can escape the fight.

From wikipedia:

Although Krav Maga shares many techniques with other martial arts, the training is often quite different. It stresses fighting under worst-case conditions or from disadvantaged positions, for example: against several opponents, when protecting someone else, with one arm unusable, when dizzy or against armed opponents. Krav Maga emphasizes rapid learning and the retzef ("continuous combat motion"), with the imperative being effectiveness,[3] for either attack or defensive situations.

Instructors emphasize two training rules: (1) there are no rules in a fight and (2) one must not injure oneself or one's partner when training.[3] Training is an intense mixed aerobic and anaerobic workout, relying heavily on the use of pads in order to experience both delivery and defense of strikes at full force. This is important because it allows the student to practice the technique at full strength, and the student holding the pad learns a little of the impact they would feel when they get hit. It can be almost as taxing to hold a pad as to practice against one. Students will also wear head guards, gum shields, groin protectors, shin and forearm guards, etc. during practice of attack/defense techniques, so that a realistic level of violence may be used without injury. Some schools incorporate "Strike and Fight," which consists of full-contact sparring[citation needed] intended to familiarize the student with the stresses of a violent situation.

Training may employ a speaker system blasting loud music, stroboscope and/or fog machine, meant to train the student to ignore peripheral distractions and focus on the needs of the situation.[citation needed] Other training methods to increase realism might include exercising the student to near exhaustion before having to defend, training outdoors on a variety of surfaces and restrictive situations, wearing a blindfold before being attacked, etc. The emphasis is on attempting to simulate real fight/attack situations as realistically as possible within the safety limitations of training.

Training will usually also cover situational awareness, to develop an understanding of one's surroundings and potentially threatening circumstances before an attack is launched. It may also cover "Self Protection": ways to deal with situations which could end in fights, and physical and verbal methods to avoid violence whenever possible.

A typical session in a civilian school is about an hour long and mixes conditioning with self-defense teaching. As levels increase, the instructors focus a little more on complicated and less common types of attacks, such as knife attacks, hostage situations and defense under extreme duress. First, the instructor will run a very intense drill to get the class' heart rates up. Then, after stretching, the instructor will teach two or three self-defense techniques. In the beginning the techniques will either be combative (punches, hammer-fists, elbows, and knees) or grappling (breaking out of chokes or wrist-grabs, getting out from under an opponent while on one's back). After that, the class usually moves to a drill that combines the techniques just taught with an aerobic technique. Finally, there is the final drill intended to burn out the students. Depending on the class - and on the instructor's mood - this drill may be at the very beginning or at the end of the class.
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  #9  
Old 09-17-2008, 06:32 PM
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that sounds intense!!! i wanna do that
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