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Old 01-15-2007, 11:23 AM
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EvilCheeseWedge EvilCheeseWedge is offline
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Join Date: Aug 2004
Location: Toledo, OH
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Maiden33 View Post
IMO
The only right way to talk about anything having to do with Nazis is from a historical point of view, and neither the antagonist's or the victim's... Rather a historical overview, same goes for most war songs. See Maiden lyrics for reference.
I disagree. 90% of Maiden's "historical" songs are like reading a passage from a textbook: all they do is tell you what happened. Just, you know, without the historical accuracy part. In my opinion, the Iron Maiden way is boring - not wrong - but boring.

Let me give you an example. I'm writing a song called "The Underground" and it's about the sarin gas attacks on the Tokyo subway system in 1995. There were quite a few victims, and most of the antagonists are still on trial to this day. I could approach this song from any number of angles. I could do a Maiden "here's what happened" song, which I won't, because I find that to be a ho-hum operation in creativity, I could write a song from the point of view of somebody who rode the subway or worked for the subway (be they a victim or not) or I could write a song from the point of view of the cult that perpetrated the attacks, either from the point of view of one of the people that carried it out, or from the point of view of the leader of the cult.

Or I could try any other number of random/hybrid approaches. Honestly, I don’t know where we’ll be going with this particular song, but I have ideas in mind.

Anyways, I think it’s ludicrous to say there’s a right or wrong way to cover history in songs. I personally think one of the more interesting things to do with history is to either insert yourself into it, ie. What would you do if you were in a particular historical situation? Or somehow relating or using history for other means. We have a song called “Hell Is Here” and the gist of the song is man’s desire for conflict. As a way to find some direction for the lyrics, our vocalist and I sat down and went through every year of the 20th century and looked at what armed conflicts America participated in and how they related to each other. For instance, our invasion of the Philippines which was a convenient staging point for our involvement in not one, but two foreign civil wars that did not directly concern us. Interesting stuff, as far as I’m concerned.
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