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ADD
01-29-2007, 05:26 PM
Due the unfortunate fact that we don't even really begin to get a glimpse of what our actual lives are outside of the limited scope of this board, its hard to really gauge what albums specifically influence how we think and interact and just live out of our lives away from the few minutes (okay, hours :D) we spend of our free time posting on here. I'm sure we all have dreams and ambitions and goals for ourselves, and maybe for the more cerebral folks here who like to mull over philosophy and other "pretentious" things (;)) I am sure that there are certain albums by bands that there is a special kind of connection to. At least for me this is true, therefore I've put together a list of albums that have really impacted my life deeply (with varying degrees depending on the album of course), or at least in some direct way have influenced me beyond just a base aural enjoyment of the music. Whether it be in my system of values, my ideas about life, my character, whatever it may be, these are some albums that I can say have significantly helped shape the person I am today. Like any good book, or any important person in my life, these are like companion pieces for my life. Hopefully you guys have some kind of attachment in this way because it is a really special thing to connect with another's art. These are their goals and ambitions and dreams that they achieved as musicians, and for me thats cool to think that how they were influenced by other people to reach their dreams of being musicians and now they are influences to me as well. Anyways, here's my list, post your too :party: Some discussion on this would be really great too. Notice they don't have to be by your favorite band, or even be your favorite album, as I don't even have a single Maiden album on my list. They were kind of the main general influence and really are the backdrop to what my life is now so its pointless really to put them on here because they influence is really all-encompassing. These albums just really stick out in my mind as being albums that impacted me a lot at whatever point in my life that was, so that's why its not so difficult to discern.


Rush- 2112
Rush- Grace Under Pressure
Rush- Vapor Trails
Tool- Lateralus
Tool- Aenima
Tool- 10,000 Days
Death- Symbolic
Death- The Sound Of Perseverance
Isis- Panopticon
Isis- In The Absence Of Truth
Pink Floyd- Dark Side Of The Moon
Pink Floyd- Meddle
BLAZE- Tenth Dimension
BLAZE- Silicon Messiah
Metallica- Master Of Puppets
Megadeth- Rust In Peace
Anthrax- Among The Living
Slayer- Show No Mercy
Dio- Holy Diver
Kyuss- Welcome To Sky Valley
Amon Amarth- With Oden On Our Side
I- Between Two Worlds
Immortal- Sons Of Northern Darkness
King Crimson- In The Court Of The Crimson King
Mastodon- Blood Mountain
Moonsorrow- Verisakeet
Queensryche- Operation: Mindcrime
Motorhead- Rock & Roll
Deep Purple- Machine Head
Judas Priest- Painkiller
Rainbow- Ritchie Blackmore's Rainbow
Black Sabbath- Heaven & Hell
Children Of Bodom- Hatebreeder


As you can see there's a range of different styles and bands here, some albums I've had for years, some I've had for mere months, but they are all linked in that they have meant so much to me and are albums I could never part with.

Even though its not the easier thing to narrow down sometimes try and post your guys' list of highly important and influential albums :cool:

ChildrenofSodom
01-29-2007, 05:40 PM
Amon Amarth- With Oden On Our Side
I- Between Two Worlds
Immortal- Sons Of Northern Darkness
Mastodon- Blood Mountain



:


these are pretty recent..I dont know how influential they can be, at this point in time.

Though they all kick ass :D

es156
01-29-2007, 05:41 PM
Add, this is a really cool idea, for a thread and in life in general. There are many people, and even some on this board, that won't "get" this thread/idea. I think that is a shame. For those who truly love music, this should be fairly thought-provoking because there will be some albums that come to mind immediately and other albums that will take more reflection. For us old folks, it might be a very long list.

:metal:

ADD
01-29-2007, 05:43 PM
Add, this is a really cool idea, for a thread and in life in general. There are many people, and even some on this board, that won't "get" this thread/idea. I think that is a shame. For those who truly love music, this should be fairly thought-provoking because there will be some albums that come to mind immediately and other albums that will take more reflection. For us old folks, it might be a very long list.

:metal:

:fist:

ADD
01-29-2007, 05:47 PM
these are pretty recent..I dont know how influential they can be, at this point in time.

Though they all kick ass :D

I don't know why you have Sons Of Northern Darkness up there since its really not THAT recent (it was released before I was into metal we'll say), but of the other ones, yeah definitely. But that doesn't mean they aren't highly impacting for me. People change constantly, I could hear an album tomorrow and thrust it up into this list. It's all about what you feel from the combination of the lyrics, the concepts, the music itself, the emotions, where you are at that point in your life, the memories that listening to those record invoke, all those things are equally important. It's not a clear cut list at all, just the ones that stand clearly above the rest in how they've helped shape my life. My thoughts and actions all reflect in some way on those albums in particular, although I think its obvious that we are influenced somehow by everything we hear or see or do, etc. Music is so important to me though, therefore I can be more selective in choosing what influences and impacts me more than in other aspects of life that have bearing on who I am.

ChildrenofSodom
01-29-2007, 06:06 PM
I don't know why you have Sons Of Northern Darkness up there since its really not THAT recent (it was released before I was into metal we'll say), but of the other ones, yeah definitely. But that doesn't mean they aren't highly impacting for me. People change constantly, I could hear an album tomorrow and thrust it up into this list. It's all about what you feel from the combination of the lyrics, the concepts, the music itself, the emotions, where you are at that point in your life, the memories that listening to those record invoke, all those things are equally important. It's not a clear cut list at all, just the ones that stand clearly above the rest in how they've helped shape my life. My thoughts and actions all reflect in some way on those albums in particular, although I think its obvious that we are influenced somehow by everything we hear or seem or do, etc. Music is so important to me though, therefore I can be more selective in choosing what influences and impacts me more than in other aspects of life that have bearing on who I am.

yeah I get what you're saying...good idea for a thread

umm...heres mine...(of the CDs I own)

Manowar-Kings of Metal
Rainbow-Ritchie Blackmores Rainbow
DIO-Holy Diver
Live-Throwing Copper *
Helloween-Walls of Jericho *
At the Gates-Slaughter of the Soul
Rammstein-Reise Reise
Kreator-Pleasure to Kill
Queensryche-Mindcrime *
Megadeth-Rust In Peace
Iron Savior-Dark Assault (my first power/speed metal album :eyes: )
Grave Digger-Tunes of War *
Grim Reaper-Fear No Evil *
Grim Reaper-See You In Hell *
Judas Priest-Painkiller
Fear Factory-Demanufacture
Black Sabbath-Paranoid *
Iron Maiden-Number of the Beast *
Dio-Very Beast of *

While all of these have shaped my musical tastes today, the ones with (*)s are some of the first albums I ever bought that really got me into rock and then metal.

powerslave_85
01-29-2007, 06:11 PM
Oooh, this'll be fun. I won't list a ton, because I want to be able to explain how each of them has changed my outlook on music :D They're more or less in chronological order.

Goo Goo Dolls- A Boy Named Goo
The first album I ever bought, when I was in 4th grade or so. They were my favorite band from then all the way until high school, when I discovered Maiden.

Green Day- Insomniac
Introduced me to punk. I literally wore out my cassette, I listened to it so much. It's still one of my favorite albums.

Metallica- Ride the Lightning
This one pretty much got me interested in metal, but there's a few other albums I listened to that also did that, like Megadeth's Cryptic Writings, but this one is the best ;)

Dead Kennedys- Give Me Convienience Or Give Me Death
Introduced me to "real" punk. I'd never heard anything like them before, with Jello Biafra's demented and bizarre vocals and the creepy surf-guitar tone that they used. In a way, DK also influenced my fucked-up sense of humor, because I found songs like "Funland At the Beach" hilarious, with the chorus of "Crushed little kids, crushed little kids, crushed little kids adorn the boardwalk!!" and shit like that.

Minor Threat- The Complete Discography
Along with DK, they also introduced me to hardcore punk. They're more abrasive and aggressive than DK, which really appealed to me for whatever reason. It was angry, fast, and violent, and for a angsty high school kid, it was perfect.

Iron Maiden- Powerslave
This was my first Maiden album, and by getting into Maiden, that opened the floodgates to countless other bands and kinds of music. My friend gave me a copied cassette of it, and at first I only liked "Aces High," and only then because of the lyrics (I'm a military buff). After a while, though, I really started to appreciate it, and he started giving me copies of NOTB, Piece of Mind, Seventh Son, etc, and I was totally hooked. The rest, as they say, is history.

Opeth- Blackwater Park
My high school science teacher (who at one point let me borrow a shoebox full of punk CDs, including the aforementioned DK and Minor Threat albums, and also was the one who got me into Maiden) mailed a burned copy of this to me one day, saying that I should check it out. I'd never heard vocals more extreme than, say, Slipknot to this point, so it really threw me for a loop. However, I didn't dismiss it or even dislike it. I enjoyed the musicianship, and eventually got used to the vocals. I credit this album with introducing me to extreme/death vocals and basically all of extreme metal.

The Clash- London Calling
London Calling is now my favorite album of all time. I bought it on a sheer whim; the only Clash songs I'd ever heard were Rock the Casbah and Should I Stay or Should I Go, neither of which are on this album. But I was blown away by the diversity of styles: Reggae, rock, punk, jazz, pretty much anything you can think of. No two songs sound alike.

Sleater-Kinney- The Woods
And now we come to the most recent of my "life changing" albums. Two summers ago, I read a Rolling Stone review of this album (it had just come out). I'd heard one of their songs on an anti-Bush compliation I had, and I liked it, but I didn't really give it a second thought. After reading the review, I decided to download The Woods and check it out. I wasn't prepared for the avalanche of howling feedback, thundering drums, or Corin Tucker's earth-shattering wail. It was one of the only albums I've ever heard that made me just sit back and go "Whoa. What the fuck was that??" Needless to say, they instantly became one of the my favorite bands ever.

So there you have it, my musical history :D

overkiller
01-29-2007, 06:14 PM
Hmmm, uh....


Slayer - Reign in Blood
A mix CD of (real) black metal that was given to me in 10th grade
Everything by Priest and Maiden, and early Sabbath


That's my list, until I'm sober, haha.

overkiller
01-29-2007, 06:42 PM
Oh, and as for my punk side, which I was into before metal, let's see...

Dead Kennedys - Plastic Surgery Disasters/In God We Trust, Inc.
Operation Ivy - Operation Ivy (still love about half of this album, I can't stand stand the ska stuff)
Bad Religion - No Control


Those are the big ones.

zgodt
01-29-2007, 06:49 PM
When I first considered the thread, I imagined it wouldn't be much different from a "favorite albums" list. But when I started thinking it through, I came up with some surprisingly different things. In approximate chronological order of intersection with my life:


The Beatles - Hey Jude

Iron Maiden - The Number of the Beast

Soundtrack for the film Terminal City Ricochet on Alternative Tentacles

Public Enemy - Fear of a Black Planet

The Grunge Years (an anthology from SubPop records)

Tom Waits - Bone Machine

Iron Maiden - No Prayer for the Dying

The Chess Box - 4-disc box set of blues musicians on Chess records

Uncle Tupelo - March 20-24, 1992

Ani Difranco - mix tape my friend Margaret made for me, which drew heavily from Not a Pretty Girl and Out of Range

The Story of Great Music from Time Life Records, 5 box sets from a series of ?, each box containing four vinyl records and a book outlining background/program notes.

Braid - Movie Music, Vol. 1

Nuggets: Original Artyfacts from the First Psychedelic Era, 1965-1968, 4-disc box set

Dismemberment Plan - Change

Charles Mingus - Mingus Ah-Um

Iron Maiden - Brave New World

Opeth - Lamentations DVD

The Coup - Steal This Album

Fe Maiden
01-29-2007, 07:09 PM
I'll list a few that come to mind first though many will be left out!

Iron Maiden - Killers
Iron Maiden - Piece Of Mind
Iron Maiden - Number Of The Beast
UFO - Lights Out
Black Sabbath - Black Sabbath
Black Sabbath - Heaven & Hell
RUSH - 2112
RUSH - Moving Pictures
RUSH - Hemispheres
Queensryche - The Warning
Queensryche - Operation Mindcrime
Led Zeppelin - IV
Led Zeppelin - Physical Graffiti
Pink Floyd - The Wall
Pink Floyd - Wish You Were Here
Pink Floyd - Dark Side Of The Moon
Metallica - Ride the Lightning
Metallica - Master Of Puppets
Megadeth - Rust In Peace


That's all for now though I may add to it later. I won't go into the reasons why I chose these particular albums because I would never get to get up from the computer. I could go on forever about some of these albums and my connection to them.

Cool Idea ADD!!!!:light:

ChildrenofSodom
01-29-2007, 07:19 PM
I cant find my Number of the Beast :(..I really wanted to listen to it, since this thread resparked some nostalgia.....

damn it.

zgodt
01-29-2007, 08:08 PM
Here's the long version of my list, with commentary.


The Beatles - Hey Jude
It's hard to single one thing out of all my parents' old records that mattered to me as a kid -- stuff like The Beach Boys' "I Get Around" and Elvis's "Hound Dog" on 45, Brownsville Station's "Smokin' in the Boys' Room" on some compilation record, not to mention John Denver. But I distinctly remember listening to "Can't Buy Me Love" one day as a kid and having this thing click in my head, and I understood how much I loved the effect of a melody line being repeated over chord changes, although obviously I never could have articulated it that way. I also loved that song because it was fast. And perhaps because I could relate to the message; maybe that was an early factor in my anti-materialist streak.

Iron Maiden - The Number of the Beast
One morning I was taping Phil Collins and Michael Jackson off Casey Kasem's top 40 countdown. That afternoon a family friend played me "The Prisoner." And in a way I count that moment as the beginning of everything else that has happened in my life. Falling in love with that song instantly turned me into a kind of an outcast -- I was choosing against the norm, choosing to prefer the abnormal. This opened the way for me gravitating toward the people I came to know, getting into every subsequent kind of music I've gotten into, making certain choices and non-choices about what to study and what kind of work to do, and I can even trace the chain of events to meeting my wife, even though it had nothing to do with music, and she can't stand anything about Iron Maiden, and when I met her she even told me that she hated guitar.

Soundtrack for the film Terminal City Ricochet on Alternative Tentacles
My best friend from high school (and to this day) played me lots of punk stuff that I didn't really get or like (and meanwhile I was plying him with stuff like Testament and Prong that he didn't really get or like). Only when I heard NoMeansNo's couple of songs on this soundtrack (including their original collaboration with Jello Biafra, "Falling Space Junk (Hold the Anchovies)") did it really start to sink in. Here was a punk band that had the musical imagination and badass riffs that I prized and sought so much in metal. It opened the door for me to come around to appreciating a whole variety of great punk bands, from Soul Asylum to the Ramones, Dead Kennedys to Husker Du, Channel 3 to Fear.... And meanwhile NoMeansNo has become my favorite band of all time.

Public Enemy - Fear of a Black Planet
Another thing my friend Kevin played me. It didn't really sink in at first, either, but it opened me up so that when my housemates in college started playing shit like Das EFX and Da Lenchmob, not to mention more Public Enemy, I was ready to hear it and appreciate it. And this receptivity to hip hop has come back around years later to have a huge (albeit indirect and probably invisible to the outside observer) influence on my current activities as a teacher and performer.

The Grunge Years (an anthology from SubPop records)
Again, I'd been hearing Nirvana and Mudhoney for a while and sort of getting it, but this album really cemented that whole scene for me. And bands of the so-called "Seattle sound" formed pretty much the core of my listening habits for a while there. Meanwhile this album was my first exposure to some bands that because quite important to me (at least temporarily), and who I in fact got to interview for the college newspaper: L7, The Walkabouts, and especially Afghan Whigs.

Tom Waits - Bone Machine
Hearing Tom Waits just changes everything. Period. I don't even know what to tell you. Except that the night I heard "Goin' Out West" from this album is also the night I heard "The Piano Has Been Drinking" from an album he'd made 15 years earlier, in an entirely different vein, and they both fucked my head up about equally.

Iron Maiden - No Prayer for the Dying
This album almost but not quite single-handedly killed metal for me for, oh, about 12 years.

The Chess Box - 4-disc box set of blues musicians on Chess records
Taught me a lot about blues, and exposed me to some artists I've come to love without reservation, especially Howlin' Wolf and Koko Taylor. And probably opened the door for me to appreciate some far older blues artists whom I've also come to love without reservation: particularly Bessie Smith and Robert Johnson. Also some particular lyrical characteristics -- most prominent in the songs of Willie Dixon -- gave me new ways to think about the world, and to construct poems, which as you may know is sort of a thing I do.

Uncle Tupelo - March 16-20, 1992
The genius of this album is it's blending of new songs written by Jay Farrar and Jeff Tweedy with covers of old Americana songs. The music is often sublime, but the project transcends music to become a work of historical synthesis about working class life. To get what I mean: track number 2 is called "Coal Miners" and it's a cover of an old rabble rousing agitprop song about how shittily the mining company treats the miner, and how the workers need to organize and "send this capitalist system to the darkest pits of hell." Track number 5 is a Farrar original called "Shaky Ground" that laments the wasted life of a miner with no real options; the chorus goes "we follow each other around on shaky ground". This kind of connection-making between present and past makes for many amazing moments of clarity about how people are now and were then and have always been.

Ani Difranco - mix tape my friend Margaret made for me, which drew heavily from Not a Pretty Girl and Out of Range
This tape made Ani Difranco both my guitar hero and my songwriting hero.

The Story of Great Music from Time Life Records, 5 box sets from a series of ?, each box containing four vinyl records and a book outlining background/program notes.
Hell yeah. I'd always been curious about classical music, but never really knew much about it, and didn't really know how to find out. Then one year we went to a big neighborhood garage sale in Ypsilanti, MI, because it was sort of the thing to do in town, and the first house we hit had this box of vinyl records for sale including 7 or 8 volumes of this Time Life Story of Great Music set. They were $1 each. So I bought 5 of them. Unfortunately, another shopper found the box around the same time I did and snatched the rest before I could come back with more money for the ones I missed. This was one of the best purchases I ever made. For the next few weeks, I would spend an hour or so in my basement having a drink and listening to the next installment of the history of classical music, and reading through the enclosed guidebooks to put it in context. I learned so much, and fell in love with some pieces and some composers that have become huge in the soundtrack of my life.

Braid - Movie Music, Vol. 1
A small but important discovery -- after a period of despairing about the state of music, and realizing I hadn't bought anything by a good new band in years, I found this on amazon by clicking through a chain of "customers who bought that also bought this" lists, and then listening to some crummy 30-second samples. I also bought something by Samiam the same way, which turned out to be mediocre as hell. But this album was great, and restored my faith that somewhere out there unbeknownst to me there had still been great bands making great music, and I just had to find them.

Nuggets: Original Artyfacts from the First Psychedelic Era, 1965-1968, 4-disc box set
My friend Jim turned me onto this priceless discovery. A 4-disc set of forgotten garage bands from the late 60s -- much of it crappy and dull, but much of it sharp and fresh and literally amazing. I discovered bands like The Sonics and The Music Machine and The Monks from whom I've since sought out complete discographies -- not to mention mind-boggling songs like "Spazz" by the Elastik Band who seem to have never released anything else but simply vanished. Here was great punk, years before punk was supposed to exist.

Dismemberment Plan - Change
This is on the list mostly for aesthetic reasons. It's simply a very unusual album with very unusual approaches to making songs - in terms of theme, point-of-view, imagery - that has had the quality of expanding my mind (not to mention breaking my heart).

Charles Mingus - Mingus Ah-Um
One of the best albums of all time, and the first jazz album that ever sunk in enough for me to be able to say something like that about it.

Iron Maiden - Brave New World
Picked this up on a whim after seeing it for $5 in the used bin. It's not on the list for being a great album, but for being decent enough that I started to wander back into Maiden and then into metal. Among other things, it led directly to my becoming part of the IMBB community, which among other things has led me here...

Opeth - Lamentations DVD
Maybe this is too recent to merit the list, but it feels important because it made me see more possibilities for the development of metal than I had foreseen. And the dichotomy between the clean set and the heavy set helped clarify for me the extent to which death metal vocals could be a valid aesthetic choice, rather than a product of limited talent and/or a trite and cartoonish attempt to be "scary." Meanwhile, the particular kinds of dissonance and disharmony that Opeth uses are something I'd been seeking for a long time in rock music.

The Coup - Steal This Album[/QUOTE]
Again, probably too recent to merit the list, but I just got this in November or so and it's one of the best albums I've ever heard. And like the Dismemberment Plan album, it's approach is so fresh and unexpected that it opens up many new possibilities for how one can see and represent the world.


Peace, ya'll.

zgodt
01-29-2007, 08:11 PM
I won't go into the reasons why I chose these particular albums because I would never get to get up from the computer. I could go on forever about some of these albums and my connection to them.

:bouville:

Pick the 5 most important then.

JRA
01-29-2007, 08:13 PM
Ozzy Osbourne- The Ultimate Sin: The first "real" album I ever bought after hearing it from my Uncle's collection.

Ozzy Osbourne- Blizzard Of Ozz: The album that kickstarted my thirst for metal/ hard rock after hearing Crazy Train on the radio.

Metallica- Metallica: Even though I don't like it that much now, it was the first Metallica album I ever bought, back when I was young, naive, and thought that these guys were the final say in metal.

Metallica- Ride The Lightning: + Jet Force Gemini = HolycuntingfuckshitwhatinLucifersfeceswasthat?!

Black Sabbath- Sabotoge: Why not?


I'll come up with more when I feel like it.

ADD
01-29-2007, 08:15 PM
When I first considered the thread, I imagined it wouldn't be much different from a "favorite albums" list. But when I started thinking it through, I came up with some surprisingly different things. In approximate chronological order of intersection with my life:




Yeah I really don't want it to be like that at all, really more of a way to see how people's tastes in music are reflected through the albums they hold most dear, and hopefully this can lead to some conversation about their importance and influence in each person's life more specifically.

overkiller
01-29-2007, 08:17 PM
Metallica- Ride The Lightning: + Jet Force Jemini = HolycuntingfuckshitwhatinthestenchofLucifersfecesw asthat?!

Jet Force Gemini? Like, the N64 game? Or am I just totally confused and nerded out.

JRA
01-29-2007, 08:22 PM
Jet Force Gemini? Like, the N64 game? Or am I just totally confused and nerded out.

You're goddamn right the N64 game, and yes I miss spelled Gemini. See what happens when you sonsabitches keep me up?

ADD
01-29-2007, 08:27 PM
Here's the long version of my list, with commentary.


The Beatles - Hey Jude
It's hard to single one thing out of all my parents' old records that mattered to me as a kid -- stuff like The Beach Boys' "I Get Around" and Elvis's "Hound Dog" on 45, Brownsville Station's "Smokin' in the Boys' Room" on some compilation record, not to mention John Denver. But I distinctly remember listening to "Can't Buy Me Love" one day as a kid and having this thing click in my head, and I understood how much I loved the effect of a melody line being repeated over chord changes, although obviously I never could have articulated it that way. I also loved that song because it was fast. And perhaps because I could relate to the message; maybe that was an early factor in my anti-materialist streak.

Iron Maiden - The Number of the Beast
One morning I was taping Phil Collins and Michael Jackson off Casey Kasem's top 40 countdown. That afternoon a family friend played me "The Prisoner." And in a way I count that moment as the beginning of everything else that has happened in my life. Falling in love with that song instantly turned me into a kind of an outcast -- I was choosing against the norm, choosing to prefer the abnormal. This opened the way for me gravitating toward the people I came to know, getting into every subsequent kind of music I've gotten into, making certain choices and non-choices about what to study and what kind of work to do, and I can even trace the chain of events to meeting my wife, even though it had nothing to do with music, and she can't stand anything about Iron Maiden, and when I met her she even told me that she hated guitar.

Soundtrack for the film Terminal City Ricochet on Alternative Tentacles
My best friend from high school (and to this day) played me lots of punk stuff that I didn't really get or like (and meanwhile I was plying him with stuff like Testament and Prong that he didn't really get or like). Only when I heard NoMeansNo's couple of songs on this soundtrack (including their original collaboration with Jello Biafra, "Falling Space Junk (Hold the Anchovies)") did it really start to sink in. Here was a punk band that had the musical imagination and badass riffs that I prized and sought so much in metal. It opened the door for me to come around to appreciating a whole variety of great punk bands, from Soul Asylum to the Ramones, Dead Kennedys to Husker Du, Channel 3 to Fear.... And meanwhile NoMeansNo has become my favorite band of all time.

Public Enemy - Fear of a Black Planet
Another thing my friend Kevin played me. It didn't really sink in at first, either, but it opened me up so that when my housemates in college started playing shit like Das EFX and Da Lenchmob, not to mention more Public Enemy, I was ready to hear it and appreciate it. And this receptivity to hip hop has come back around years later to have a huge (albeit indirect and probably invisible to the outside observer) influence on my current activities as a teacher and performer.

The Grunge Years (an anthology from SubPop records)
Again, I'd been hearing Nirvana and Mudhoney for a while and sort of getting it, but this album really cemented that whole scene for me. And bands of the so-called "Seattle sound" formed pretty much the core of my listening habits for a while there. Meanwhile this album was my first exposure to some bands that because quite important to me (at least temporarily), and who I in fact got to interview for the college newspaper: L7, The Walkabouts, and especially Afghan Whigs.

Tom Waits - Bone Machine
Hearing Tom Waits just changes everything. Period. I don't even know what to tell you. Except that the night I heard "Goin' Out West" from this album is also the night I heard "The Piano Has Been Drinking" from an album he'd made 15 years earlier, in an entirely different vein, and they both fucked my head up about equally.

Iron Maiden - No Prayer for the Dying
This album almost but not quite single-handedly killed metal for me for, oh, about 12 years.

The Chess Box - 4-disc box set of blues musicians on Chess records
Taught me a lot about blues, and exposed me to some artists I've come to love without reservation, especially Howlin' Wolf and Koko Taylor. And probably opened the door for me to appreciate some far older blues artists whom I've also come to love without reservation: particularly Bessie Smith and Robert Johnson. Also some particular lyrical characteristics -- most prominent in the songs of Willie Dixon -- gave me new ways to think about the world, and to construct poems, which as you may know is sort of a thing I do.

Uncle Tupelo - March 16-20, 1992
The genius of this album is it's blending of new songs written by Jay Farrar and Jeff Tweedy with covers of old Americana songs. The music is often sublime, but the project transcends music to become a work of historical synthesis about working class life. To get what I mean: track number 2 is called "Coal Miners" and it's a cover of an old rabble rousing agitprop song about how shittily the mining company treats the miner, and how the workers need to organize and "send this capitalist system to the darkest pits of hell." Track number 5 is a Farrar original called "Shaky Ground" that laments the wasted life of a miner with no real options; the chorus goes "we follow each other around on shaky ground". This kind of connection-making between present and past makes for many amazing moments of clarity about how people are now and were then and have always been.

Ani Difranco - mix tape my friend Margaret made for me, which drew heavily from Not a Pretty Girl and Out of Range
This tape made Ani Difranco both my guitar hero and my songwriting hero.

The Story of Great Music from Time Life Records, 5 box sets from a series of ?, each box containing four vinyl records and a book outlining background/program notes.
Hell yeah. I'd always been curious about classical music, but never really knew much about it, and didn't really know how to find out. Then one year we went to a big neighborhood garage sale in Ypsilanti, MI, because it was sort of the thing to do in town, and the first house we hit had this box of vinyl records for sale including 7 or 8 volumes of this Time Life Story of Great Music set. They were $1 each. So I bought 5 of them. Unfortunately, another shopper found the box around the same time I did and snatched the rest before I could come back with more money for the ones I missed. This was one of the best purchases I ever made. For the next few weeks, I would spend an hour or so in my basement having a drink and listening to the next installment of the history of classical music, and reading through the enclosed guidebooks to put it in context. I learned so much, and fell in love with some pieces and some composers that have become huge in the soundtrack of my life.

Braid - Movie Music, Vol. 1
A small but important discovery -- after a period of despairing about the state of music, and realizing I hadn't bought anything by a good new band in years, I found this on amazon by clicking through a chain of "customers who bought that also bought this" lists, and then listening to some crummy 30-second samples. I also bought something by Samiam the same way, which turned out to be mediocre as hell. But this album was great, and restored my faith that somewhere out there unbeknownst to me there had still been great bands making great music, and I just had to find them.

Nuggets: Original Artyfacts from the First Psychedelic Era, 1965-1968, 4-disc box set
My friend Jim turned me onto this priceless discovery. A 4-disc set of forgotten garage bands from the late 60s -- much of it crappy and dull, but much of it sharp and fresh and literally amazing. I discovered bands like The Sonics and The Music Machine and The Monks from whom I've since sought out complete discographies -- not to mention mind-boggling songs like "Spazz" by the Elastik Band who seem to have never released anything else but simply vanished. Here was great punk, years before punk was supposed to exist.

Dismemberment Plan - Change
This is on the list mostly for aesthetic reasons. It's simply a very unusual album with very unusual approaches to making songs - in terms of theme, point-of-view, imagery - that has had the quality of expanding my mind (not to mention breaking my heart).

Charles Mingus - Mingus Ah-Um
One of the best albums of all time, and the first jazz album that ever sunk in enough for me to be able to say something like that about it.

Iron Maiden - Brave New World
Picked this up on a whim after seeing it for $5 in the used bin. It's not on the list for being a great album, but for being decent enough that I started to wander back into Maiden and then into metal. Among other things, it led directly to my becoming part of the IMBB community, which among other things has led me here...

Opeth - Lamentations DVD
Maybe this is too recent to merit the list, but it feels important because it made me see more possibilities for the development of metal than I had foreseen. And the dichotomy between the clean set and the heavy set helped clarify for me the extent to which death metal vocals could be a valid aesthetic choice, rather than a product of limited talent and/or a trite and cartoonish attempt to be "scary." Meanwhile, the particular kinds of dissonance and disharmony that Opeth uses are something I'd been seeking for a long time in rock music.

The Coup - Steal This Album
Again, probably too recent to merit the list, but I just got this in November or so and it's one of the best albums I've ever heard. And like the Dismemberment Plan album, it's approach is so fresh and unexpected that it opens up many new possibilities for how one can see and represent the world.


Peace, ya'll.[/QUOTE]

THIS is what I'm talkin' about :rocker: :rocker: :rocker:

I'll probably pick like 10 from my list and do the same thing. I encourage more people to do likewise :)

SomewhereInTime72
01-29-2007, 08:50 PM
Argh. Sort of a list. I'll elaborate on some later. Also, I'll order it later. :eyes:

System of A Down - System Of A Down
Korn - Korn
Metallica - Master Of Puppets
Disturbed - The Sickness
Dir en grey - Gauze
Bruce Dickinson - The Chemical Wedding
Tool - Aenema
Metallica - ...And Justice For All
Iron Maiden - Number Of The Beast
Judas Priest - British Steel
Queensryche - Operation: Mindcrime
Ozzy Osbourne - Blizzard Of Ozz
Helloween - Keeper Of The Seven Keys Pts1 + 2
Amorphis - The Karelian Isthmus
Megadeth - Rust In Peace
In Flames - Clayman
Judas Priest - Sad Wings Of Destiny
Foreigner - Foreigner
King Crimson - In The Court Of The Crimson King
Children Of Bodom - Hatebreeder
King Crimson - Discipline

Wow I should have been harsher... but there were a lot of albums I didn't wanna leave out. :snivel:

DethMaiden
01-30-2007, 04:45 AM
I'll do kinda what Nick did when I get the time.

Fe Maiden
01-30-2007, 06:21 AM
:bouville:

Pick the 5 most important then.That would prove to be very difficult and would still take forever!

zgodt
01-30-2007, 07:37 AM
That would prove to be very difficult and would still take forever!

I know. I think mine took an hour and a half. :hecho:

Div
01-30-2007, 08:32 AM
Beach Boys - ?
was a tape I used to listen to as a kid, don't remember what album/compilation it was, but it was the first music I listened to.

Weird Al - Dare To Be Stupid
was probably my most favorite album from all of my youth.

Pink Floyd - The Wall
this one was my favorite from around my later highschool days.

Dire Straits - Private Investigations
another importatant one

Kamelot - Fourth Legacy
:D

Iced Earth - Alive In Athens
well, it seemed special when I got it, and its still a pretty great album.

Queensryche - Operation: Mindcrime
Amazing concept album

Iron Maiden - Seventh Son
needs no explanation

DethMaiden
01-30-2007, 11:45 AM
Okay, here goes nothing. I'm gonna keep the number reasonable because not every band I love made an album that was important in my evolution as a music fan.

Linkin Park- Hybrid Theory: This was the first album I bought that wasn't recorded by a boy band. Yes, I had dark beginnings. I heard a song from this on one of the pop radio stations I listened to and bought the album on my tenth or eleventh birthday. I was prompted to sell my boy band collection and buy some albums by radio rock outfits like Matchbox Twenty and Creed, since music with instruments was still new to me.

Iron Maiden- The Number of the Beast: A couple years after being converted to rock music, I bought Tony Hawk's Pro Skater 4 and happened to hear a song by a band called Iron Maiden, a song entitled "The Number of the Beast" which said all kinds of things that went against my Christian upbringing. Impressionable twelve-year-old that I was, I went out and bought the album bearing said song and played it loud every night for a month, then bought Piece of Mind and did the same damn thing. This is easily the most important album I've ever purchased.

Queensrÿche- Operation: Mindcrime: Upon discovering that I was a fledgling metalhead, a family friend recommended to me "the greatest album of all time", as he put it, Operation: Mindcrime. Skeptical but still impressionable, I bought it the next morning (yes, that soon). I was, needless to say, blown the fuck away. My first concept album, and my first album of what was to become my favorite band, Mindcrime remains my favorite album, and I'm eternally grateful that I reciprocated when I was told to buy it.

Alice in Chains- Dirt: This is a late addition, and I'm not even sure as to how it was/is super-influential on me and my tastes. It wasn't even my first AIC album. But this is the album that made me really want to play guitar, and the first album I heard that turned me on to a style of metal that didn't involve vocalists in the vein of Tate, Dickinson, Halford, and Dio. Listening to it again tonight has helped me realize that this is truly one of the greatest albums of all time.

At the Gates- Slaughter of the Soul: After maybe nine months of being into metal, I still had never heard anything with extreme vocals, and while being aware of their existence, I thought them barbaric and stupid. Then I was listening to Music Choice and heard "Blinded By Fear" by At the Gates. I realized, hey, this actually ain't half bad, and when I saw Slaughter of the Soul in CD Connection, I bought it. For awhile I considered it a top ten record for me, but my evolution in tastes has knocked it down several notches. However, I respect it immensely for getting my ears accustomed to death vocals.

Rush- Moving Pictures: For a time after becoming a fan of metal, I refused to listen to anything else. It was all metal, all the time, and fuck the people who didn't do the same. I realized what a goddamned moron I was when I bought Moving Pictures on a whim, remembering that I had liked some Rush from classic rock radio. My view of music did a 180 soon thereafter, as I have arguably become more prog than metal.

Mastodon- Leviathan: As a metalhead unexposed to any bands except the main thirty or so that come to mind immediately when speaking of metal, buying Mastodon's 2004 opus was the first time in my life that I realized metal still had a scene, and it gave me a hope in my generation that I had never possessed. I still think Mastodon are the shining light of the "new" scene, even though I've been exposed to quite a few more newer bands since the release of Leviathan.

Genesis- The Lamb Lies Down On Broadway: I just bought this one in August of 2006, and already I can recognize the indelible mark it left on the way I look at music. For those who think I became a huge Genesis fan overnight, I actually already had Foxtrot and We Can't Dance at the time I bought The Lamb. However, they hadn't affected me quite like this one did and still is. Peter Gabriel's lyrics were extremely cryptic, and for the first time in my musical life, I took an interest in what was really being said and deciphered all of the songs to see what the story's message truly was. It opened my eyes to schools of thought I didn't know existed and molded me to the state I would say I presently occupy: the highly intellectual music fan. :tongue:

Whew.

ADD
01-30-2007, 11:55 AM
Okay, here goes nothing. I'm gonna keep the number reasonable because not every band I love made an album that was important in my evolution as a music fan.

Linkin Park- Hybrid Theory: This was the first album I bought that wasn't recorded by a boy band. Yes, I had dark beginnings. I heard a song from this on one of the pop radio stations I listened to and bought the album on my tenth or eleventh birthday. I was prompted to sell my boy band collection and buy some albums by radio rock outfits like Matchbox Twenty and Creed, since music with instruments was still new to me.

Iron Maiden- The Number of the Beast: A couple years after being converted to rock music, I bought Tony Hawk's Pro Skater 4 and happened to hear a song by a band called Iron Maiden, a song entitled "The Number of the Beast" which said all kinds of things that went against my Christian upbringing. Impressionable twelve-year-old that I was, I went out and bought the album bearing said song and played it loud every night for a month, then bought Piece of Mind and did the same damn thing. This is easily the most important album I've ever purchased.

Queensr˙che- Operation: Mindcrime: Upon discovering that I was a fledgling metalhead, a family friend recommended to me "the greatest album of all time", as he put it, Operation: Mindcrime. Skeptical but still impressionable, I bought it the next morning (yes, that soon). I was, needless to say, blown the fuck away. My first concept album, and my first album of what was to become my favorite band, Mindcrime remains my favorite album, and I'm eternally grateful that I reciprocated when I was told to buy it.

At the Gates- Slaughter of the Soul: After maybe nine months of being into metal, I still had never heard anything with extreme vocals, and while being aware of their existence, I thought them barbaric and stupid. Then I was listening to Music Choice and heard "Blinded By Fear" by At the Gates. I realized, hey, this actually ain't half bad, and when I saw Slaughter of the Soul in CD Connection, I bought it. For awhile I considered it a top ten record for me, but my evolution in tastes has knocked it down several notches. However, I respect it immensely for getting my ears accustomed to death vocals.

Rush- Moving Pictures: For a time after becoming a fan of metal, I refused to listen to anything else. It was all metal, all the time, and fuck the people who didn't do the same. I realized what a goddamned moron I was when I bought Moving Pictures on a whim, remembering that I had liked some Rush from classic rock radio. My view of music did a 180 soon thereafter, as I have arguably become more prog than metal.

Mastodon- Leviathan: As a metalhead unexposed to any bands except the main thirty or so that come to mind immediately when speaking of metal, buying Mastodon's 2004 opus was the first time in my life that I realized metal still had a scene, and it gave me a hope in my generation that I had never possessed. I still think Mastodon are the shining light of the "new" scene, even though I've been exposed to quite a few more newer bands since the release of Leviathan.

Genesis- The Lamb Lies Down On Broadway: I just bought this one in August of 2006, and already I can recognize the indelible mark it left on the way I look at music. For those who think I became a huge Genesis fan overnight, I actually already had Foxtrot and We Can't Dance at the time I bought The Lamb. However, they hadn't affected me quite like this one did and still is. Peter Gabriel's lyrics were extremely cryptic, and for the first time in my musical life, I took an interest in what was really being said and deciphered all of the songs to see what the story's message truly was. It opened my eyes to schools of thought I didn't know existed and molded me to the state I would say I presently occupy: the highly intellectual music fan. :tongue:

Whew.


Yes :blaze: Great stuff, thank you for sharing!!!

DethMaiden
01-30-2007, 11:55 AM
Yes :blaze: Great stuff, thank you for sharing!!!

I realize the only one we share is Mindcrime. Kinda weird!

Fe Maiden
01-30-2007, 12:40 PM
I know. I think mine took an hour and a half. :hecho:
It may take me that long for each album and I feel some things may be a bit too personal to explain.

DethMaiden
01-30-2007, 03:44 PM
Went back and added Dirt by Alice in Chains. How could I forget?

ChildrenofSodom
01-30-2007, 03:50 PM
Went back and added Dirt by Alice in Chains. How could I forget?

I hate to say...but Linkin Park are my guilty pleasure.....:eyes:

DethMaiden
01-30-2007, 03:53 PM
I hate to say...but Linkin Park are my guilty pleasure.....:eyes:

Yeah, some of the early rock I was into I still enjoy a good deal when it comes on the radio.

DreamEvil001
01-30-2007, 04:25 PM
Alright here goes. I put this in chronological order of my life. This is by no accounts a list of my favorite CD's (or even, in some cases, cds I even listen to anymore), but the ones that influenced my musical life today. I try to stick to very broad CDs to outline all the music I listen to, not just metal, but there is repetition in metal since it was so influential and remains my main bread and butter listening content.



Raffi- Seriously. Embarassing but what the fuck; I loved Apples and Bananas when I was 5 and some of his cd's were my first experiences with music.


AC/DC: Back in Black- When I got my first CD player I borrowed this from my dad and listened to it for a couple months; my first rock CD (along with a best-of by George Thorogood). This disc got me really into listening to music habitually and starting a collection: hello iTunes.


Dio: The Very Beast of Dio- Metaldrummer 888 burned this beauty for me and it was my first introduction to metal. It took me a while to get into, but the commercial-friendly Rainbow in the Dark got me originally intrigued. Dio became my favorite band for a year or two and opened the floodgates to all the rest. In addtition my first metal concert. (Not including an acoustic Metallica performance my dad says we saw when i was 7 at an annual charity gig for the Bridge School for kids with special needs; but I don't even remember it so it doesn't count)


Black Sabbath: We Sold Our Soul For Rock 'N' Roll- Bought this in 8th(?) grade; the first metal CD that I bought; remains kick-ass. I couldn't put this down for a while.


Iron Maiden: Piece Of Mind- Not my first Maiden CD, but the first one that I bought and therefore gave more consideration to. It blew my current expectation of what music should be out of the water. Plus the solo in Flight of Icarus convinced me to pick up guitar; it was so damn catchy I was just like "fuck I want to do that". Every single metal band I listened to post-getting this CD, are because of Maiden.


Scorpions: 10 Best Collection- Not very influential, probably could have been skipped, but it did introduce me to more mainstream 80's pop-metal. Led to limited listening of Aerosmith (easily the best of the lot), Def Leppard, Van Halen, Kiss, Motley Crue.


Metallica: Black Album- This album and Master of Puppets opened me to even ''harder'' stuff, Pantera, Slayer, etc.


The Temptations: The Ultimate Collection- Around this time my brother bought this CD; we had seen the made-for-TV movie-biography and its a great movie. This CD opened my eyes to even more music genres: Motown, soul, and pyschedelic-funk with their later stuff. Still one of my favorite CD's.


HammerFall: Legacy of Kings- Even though I no longer can stand this band it introduced me to powermetal. Better bands would come down the pipe such as Edguy, Helloween, Grave Digger, and Dream Evil (not what my sn is from; that would be the Dio CD of the same name).


Children of Bodom: Hate Crew Deathroll- Again, took me a while to get used to, but it remains one of my favorite CDs. It introduced me to harsh vocals and led to Arch Enemy, In Flames, Death, etc.


Alice in Chains: Unplugged- My dad gave me a burned copy of this from a co-worker and I love it. I haven't had it that long so I'm not sure of its total effects but it did convince me to buy Facelift, Dirt, and re-listen to Jar of Flies, which I'd had a copy of for some time, all of which are great.


Sublime: Self-Titled- Good band, fuck you. Led to a little punk, reggae, ska, etc.


Lynyrd Skynyrd: All-time Greatest Hits- Great stuff, opened me up to some southern rock, Allman Brothers Band, ZZ Top, even Blues Traveler etc.


Rage Against the Machine: Self-Titled- Again, I only got into this band recently, but I love this CD and the other of theirs' I own and can tell they have already influenced me greatly. I don't yet know what other bands this will lead to... hopefully not limp bizkit:hecho:


I intended this list to be short, but looking back it's much longer than I anticipated. Awesome thread :horns:


Edit: I used this list as a reference point. I assumed you could deduce I listen to for example, Judas Priest, Saxon, James Brown, Blind Guardian. If I listed bands a Cd led to it was probably more to clarify what bands i didn't listen to.

JRA
01-30-2007, 04:32 PM
Raffi- Seriously. Embarassing but what the fuck; I loved Apples and Bananas when I was 5 and some of his cd's were my first experiences with music.




Every kid listened to that and/or RosenShontz when they were a kid. Anyone who says they didn't is either a liar or a sick fuck.:D

Also, Raffi > Sublime.


Fuck, Opeth > Sublime.

DethMaiden
01-30-2007, 04:37 PM
Fuck, Opeth > Sublime.

:party: :party: :party:

theclansman1114
01-30-2007, 04:56 PM
Eagles - Hell Freezes Over My dad is pretty much responsible for getting me into any real music. As far back as I can remember this album was always playing in my basement, my dad loves this band. So it was this particular album that got me into music, specifically rock. So I guess I was about 9 or 10 when I started to really listen to it.

AC/DC - Back In Black Bought this in 6th grade, when I got this album, it pretty much hooked me onto rock.... which lead me to:

Iron Maiden - Brave New World I heard The Wickerman on the radio shortly after this album was released and immediatley picked up the album. This is one of the two most influential albums for me. It got me into metal and was the reason I started to play guitar.

Helloween - The Keeper of the Seven Keys Part II Of course Kai Hansen was going to be a part of this at some point. When I heard the song "I Want Out" for the first time, I believe I was just getting into high school, I was in shock. I picked up Keeper II shortly afterwards, which eventually led me to:

Gamma Ray - Blast From The Past This is the album that led to my craze for power metal. It is a fine collection to say the VERY least. This is the other most influential album. Gamma Ray was pretty much the band that "opened the door" for me or so to speak.

DreamEvil001
01-30-2007, 07:35 PM
1.Every kid listened to that and/or RosenShontz when they were a kid. Anyone who says they didn't is either a liar or a sick fuck.:D

2.Also, Raffi > Sublime.


3.Fuck, Opeth > Sublime.

1.:light: :tongue:

2. Yeah, I don't like'm as much as I once did, but influence me they did, on the list they went.

3. I wouldn't go that far:D

SomewhereInTime72
01-30-2007, 08:11 PM
Here's an expansion on some of the albums I listed. I wont go overboard cause I don't wanna eat up all my time. I'll end up spending a crapton of time with short explanations anyway.

System of a down - System of a down: This was the first cd I ever bought for myself, and for awhile SOAD were my favorite band. I established myself as a fan of heavy music.

Korn - Korn: Korn were my favorite band for about a year, also my first concert I actually remember. They inspired me to pick up a guitar and my whole circle of friends at the time was established through this band, and while none of us like Korn anymore, most of us are still friends.

Metallica - ...And Justice For All: Metallica were also my favorite band at one point in time, and this album is and was (after a while) my favorite of theirs. This album opened me up to some real longer riff-driven songs as well as longer instrumental sections. Metallica were sorta my "gateway" band into real metal...

Iron Maiden - Number of the beast: Maybe it wasn't this album that changed me so much as my first Maiden concert that I saw not shortly after (2003's give me ed tour :horns: and I've seen 'em once yearly since :cool: ) Definitely not my favorite Maiden album now, but the aforementioned concert was what established Maiden as my favorite band, and they rather obviously still are. Before I got this album, I thought Maiden were kinda "gay" what with their "cheesy high pitched" guitar sounds and "cheesy high pitched" vocals, but with some pressing from my old Korn friends (we'd grown over the past year :eyes: )I finally did a turnaround and got this album and... here I am! :horns:

Megadeth - Rust In Peace: This is still my favorite thrash album. Before this album, the only thrash band I liked was Metallica, and really only the first 2 and half albums were thrashy. This shit blew my mind, and marty friedmans solos... just wow... As a guitarist and a fan of metal, this changed my outlook on everything.

I'm tired I'll go chronologically further later. This is fun. :)

zgodt
01-31-2007, 06:14 AM
It may take me that long for each album and I feel some things may be a bit too personal to explain.

Okay. :)

zgodt
01-31-2007, 06:15 AM
Linkin Park- Hybrid Theory: This was the first album I bought that wasn't recorded by a boy band.

I sense a contradiction. ;)

JRA
01-31-2007, 07:54 AM
I sense a contradiction. ;)


:lol:

jsheajr
01-31-2007, 12:33 PM
Metal:

Reign In Blood - Slayer
South of Heaven - Slayer
2112 - Rush
Moving Pictures - Rush
The Number of the Beast - Iron Maiden
Live After Death - Iron Maiden
Rage For Order - Queensryche
Operation:Mindcrime - Queensryche
Screaming For Vengeance - Judas Priest
Painkiller - Judas Priest
Sabbath, Bloody Sabbath - Black Sabbath
Blizzard of Ozz - Ozzy
Ride the Lightning - Metallica
Master of Puppets - Metallica
Among the Living - Anthrax
Blessing in Disguise - Metal Church
In the Shadows - Mercyful Fate
Conspiracy - King Diamond
Non-Metal:Time Heals Nothing - Crowbar
Peace Sells...But Who's Buying - Megadeth

Non-Metal:

Disintegration - The Cure
Abbey Road - The Beatles
Harvest - Neil Young
Time Out of Mind - Bob Dylan
Road to Ruin - The Ramones
God Shuffled His Feet - Crash Test Dummies
Purple Rain - Prince
A Rush of Blood to the Head - Coldplay
August and Everything After - Counting Crows
Nermind - Nirvana

jsheajr
01-31-2007, 12:34 PM
Oops! Crowbar should not say "non-metal" before it. I mistyped. Sorry!

Fe Maiden
01-31-2007, 01:34 PM
Oops! Crowbar should not say "non-metal" before it. I mistyped. Sorry!You can edit your posts if needed and welcome to the board!

jsheajr
01-31-2007, 03:14 PM
Thanks! I'm going to the Slayer show in Kansas City, Kansas on Saturday nite and will post the setlist on here afterwards.

DethMaiden
01-31-2007, 04:52 PM
I sense a contradiction. ;)

Nice! :lol:

Spiral_Slave
01-31-2007, 05:29 PM
Therion's Gothic Kabbalah does something to do me that no other album has ever done. It gives me this wierd feeling, almost like a trip. I don't know, I love the album.

Maiden33
02-03-2007, 07:38 PM
I'm gonna do about 10 only, cause I'm gonna include a short description to each for why I would consider them so special to me... Anyway, these albums would be (in rough time order of when I got them):

Def Leppard - Pyromania - I bought this album in I think 6th grade and played the living hell out of it... at this point I really had no idea what metal was, I was just enjoying hard rock music... Def Leppard became the first band I saw live, shortly thereafter.

Metallica - Metallica - Despite my current personal feelings on the band, this album's place in my personal history cannot be denied. It was the first truly metal thing I ever bought, and at the time it ruled my world, for one reason or another... it opened the door for me exploring other metal

Iron Maiden - Brave New World - The album with which I was truly introduced to Maiden, who have become my favorite band and have been for several years now... I still consider the album one of my favorites and still hold it very very close to my heart

Dio - Holy Diver - Another early metal classic I was introduced to... I still consider Dio one of my favorite artists for his various work, but this album and its follower the Last in Line particularly

Queensryche - Operation : Mindcrime - I don't really feel I need to explain this one too much, most of the people on this board respect the power of this almighty album.

Stratovarius - Visions - The first power metal album I ever bought. When I put this album on I couldn't believe what I was hearing... I fell in love with these guys on the spot, and they remain one of my favorite bands, as this remains my favorite album of theirs by far... well over 3 years later and owning 8 other albums of theirs

Edguy - King of Fools EP - I have a friend with a radio show, who back in February of 2004 played the track "New Age Messiah" off this EP on his show, and the song absolutely blew me away, and I bought the EP the very next day. It's one of the few single purchases I've ever made that I think changed my life. These songs totally amazed me, and even though Edguy have become my 3rd favorite band and I own all but one of their 7 albums, this EP still probably remains my favorite single release of theirs

Symphony X - V: The New Mythology - This probably stands at the top of my list for the weirdest experience I ever had putting on a new album... this album stands as one of the most unique things I'd ever heard at that time, or in the 2 and a half years since. I consider this album a grand and amazing statement of amazing proportions.

Evergrey - Solitude, Dominance, Tragedy - Another band that's become a big favorite of mine... And one that I hold very close due to the personal level of their lyrics... listening to an Evergrey album for me is an emotional journey, and this was how I was introduced to them.

Savatage - Edge of Thorns - Savatage has managed to become my 2nd favorite band for a number a reasons, but I can say that this album is solely responsible for me even getting into them. The first time I ever heard them, I couldn't stand Jon Oliva's voice, so months later I heard about Zach Stevens, and I bought this album as a result. In the time that followed, I was inspired to get the other Zach-era albums, and later even broaden myself to accept Jon Oliva's vocals.

Savatage - Streets - Saddly, I've discovered this album relatively late, or more recently rather, only buying it in the spring of 06... but I can faithfully say that this album has changed my life. Upon my first full listen, I reconsidered my stances on life, death, religion, and all sorts of other stuff too... it also is home to what is without doubt one of my favorite songs, bar none... Believe

jaysadler2
02-04-2007, 08:24 AM
Some of mine, most of these really got me in to metal, got me think about issues, and pick up the guitar, say what u want about these albums, i dont care! :bouville:

Led Zeppelin - IV
The Beatles - please please me :D
Black Sabbath - Paranoid
Bon Jovi - Slippery When Wet :light:
Dio - Holy Diver :rocker:
Dire Straits - Brothers in Arms :light:
Dragonforce - Sonic Firestorm
Guns n roses - Apetite for Destruction
Iron Maiden - Iron Maiden :
Iron Maiden - Powerslave
Kiss - Destroyer :eek:
Korn - Untouchables :eyes:
Limp Bizkit - Significant Other :eyes:
Metallica - Kill em all
Metallica - Ride the lightning
Metallica - ..And justice for all
Metallica - Master of puppets
Misfits - Earth A.D :bouville:
Ozzy Osbourne - Bark at the moon
Pantera - Cowboys from hell
Ramones - ramones :cool:
Rancid - And out come the wolves
Red hot chili peppers - Californication :eyes:
Slayer - Reign in blood
Slayer - Seasons in the Abyss
The Police - Syncronicity :party:
Trivium - Asscendancy
Van Halen - Van Halen :rocker:

anthraxmosher
02-04-2007, 01:39 PM
These albums are pretty much what started my obsession with anything metal. Although, some are not metal, they are just as good, and, at times, better than the metal albums. ENJOY!

Kiss-Destoryer

My first real album. My mom bough it for me for my 13th birthday and I pretty much played the CD to death. It was all I listened to night and day and pretty much solidified KISS as the greatest band in the world in my opinion. Still my favorite album....EVER!

AC/DC-Dirty Deeds Done Dirt Cheap

My mom also bought this for me on my 13th birthday and when I wasnt listening to Destroyer, I was listening to Dirty Deeds Done Dirt Cheap. It introduced me to everything that truly was AC/DC and rock and roll in general. This remains one of my favorite albums of all time.

Iron Maiden-Rock in Rio

The first REAL metal album I ever bought. After hearing about them, I went out and bought the first album I could find. I bought Rock in Rio and was instantly blown away. Never have I been so blown away by a live album. It could be the fact that theres 250,000 people singing along to each song or it could be the fact that its simply Iron Maiden. Whatever the reason. This album rules. DONT FUCK WITH IT!

Black Sabbath-Paranoid

What can be said about this album that hasnt already been said. This album should be mandatory listening for anyone looking to get into metal. One of the best albums ever. Sabbath at its finest.

Metallica-Master Of Puppets

My first Metallica album and still my favorite. This album alone smashes any hope Megadeth ever thought they had of being better than Metallica. I cant listen to this album and skip a song. Its impossible. My second favorite album of all time. Bar none.

Slayer-Reign in Blood

Introduced me to Slayer and to thrash metal in general. This album opened the flood gates for most of the bands I listen to today. If it werent for this album, id have no idea who Anthrax, Exodus, Testament, or any other thrash band for that were. This album owns you.

There you have it. Not many albums. But if I had to choose 6 albums to listen to for the rest of my life, it would be these 6. No doubt about it.

metal_man1019
09-15-2007, 06:52 PM
Black Sabbath-Master Of Reality

Led Zeppelin-Physical Graffiti

Metallica-Ride The Lightning

Iron Maiden-Peice Of Mind

Deep Purple-Machine Head

Rush-2112

Ozzy Osbourne-Diary Of A Madman

Slayer-South Of Heaven

Pantera-The Great Southern Trendkill

Megadeth-Rust In Peace

System Of A Down-Toxicty

Rage Against The Machine-Rage Against The Machine

ACDC-Powerage

Dio-Holy Diver

Queensryche-Operation Mindcrime

Helloween-Helloween