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ChildrenofSodom
11-05-2006, 08:09 PM
This to to EvilCheeseWedge, Spiral_Slave, and other one else here that has a band.

How does your band record? We are using a crappy, small Olympus digital recorder. Obviously, that is not how you record a song...

So...could you suggest any other methods; either things that we can buy or studio renting.

MetalDrummer888
11-05-2006, 08:12 PM
dont keep buying things . . . in the end you will just wish you had spent the money on studio time. If you have a music engineering school near you, you can get them to record your album for cheap (or free) but usually its at some weird time like 2 Am on tuesday or w/e.

ChildrenofSodom
11-05-2006, 08:13 PM
dont keep buying things . . . in the end you will just wish you had spent the money on studio time. If you have a music engineering school near you, you can get them to record your album for cheap (or free) but usually its at some weird time like 2 Am on tuesday or w/e.

well, my uncle already had the mic and the recorder is my ghost-hunting recorder...so...we havent spent any money on the song yet....but I know some local bands use 4-track recorders or something.

Spiral_Slave
11-05-2006, 08:14 PM
I know next to nothing about recording, but my friend Andy does and I'll ask him what the best methods are.

ChildrenofSodom
11-05-2006, 08:30 PM
This girl at our school that manages a few emo bands just told me that she might be able to get us some studio time real cheap. So. Hopefully we can get Karmic Retribution down pat and get a short demo out there. And another kid in an acoustic/folk/indie bands holds garage concerts periodically and he said he would save a spot for us if we ever wanted to play a song or two..so...

MetalDrummer888
11-05-2006, 08:31 PM
This girl at our school that manages a few emo bands just told me that she might be able to get us some studio time real cheap. So. Hopefully we can get Karmic Retribution down pat and get a short demo out there. And another kid in an acoustic/folk/indie bands holds garage concerts periodically and he said he would save a spot for us if we ever wanted to play a song or two..so...
thats more like it :party: :party:

EvilCheeseWedge
11-05-2006, 09:42 PM
I'll give you the run down tomorrow morning, I'm just too fucking tired to explain it tonight ;)

DethMaiden
11-06-2006, 03:35 AM
Ha, we have one track that's bass, guitar, and vocals and another that's just drums because the drums drowned out everything and we needed to reduce them. It's fairly awesome if I don't say so myself. :D Lyrics so far:

The wings of the phoenix carry me home
Lost in this place cold and alone
I pledge myself to prophets I cannot see
If there is a God, why won't he save me?

ChildrenofSodom
11-06-2006, 03:37 AM
Ha, we have one track that's bass, guitar, and vocals and another that's just drums because the drums drowned out everything and we needed to reduce them. It's fairly awesome if I don't say so myself. :D Lyrics so far:

The wings of the phoenix carry me home
Lost in this place cold and alone
I pledge myself to prophets I cannot see
If there is a God, why won't he save me?
If we move into another room, that is smaller, I think it will make a difference, because the acoustics in that room echo every drum hit way too much.

EvilCheeseWedge
11-06-2006, 07:56 AM
When I was in high school I used to record some shitty bands around here on a low-tech setup, and since I'm guessing you guys don't have much equipment, I'll give you the run down on what I used to do, because even with shitty equipment most of the recording sounded pretty decent anyways.

First of all, get a computer, with a decent soundcard, and get a good recording program. At this point, you probably can't record everybody at once and have it sound very good, beacause that takes a lot of equipment and stuff like that (and is probably best left for the studio.) But what you can do is track people individually. That's what we do, that's what I've had bands in the past do.

There's a couple ways to do it - band preference ftw. In high school the bands would usually lay drums down first. The guitarist would play for the drummer through headphones so he had something to go by, and then the rest of the instruments would be stack on that. Our drummer doesn't like laying drums down first, so we usually lay guitar and bass down. But we play to a metronome, which I definitely recommend.

Anyways, drums will probably be your toughest thing because I'm guessing you have limited microphones and you probably don't have a mixer. Try to find something you can at least run one or two microphones into so it isn't direct into the computer. I used to use a 25-year old tape deck for this. It worked pretty well, because I could cut the clipping on the deck, and then I'd record direct from the deck (not record to tape) and the drums would end up sounding about as good as could be expected from the equipment used.

Because we only had two microphones then I just rigged up two-overheads using duct tape.

I personally vote for buying equipment though, because you can double it as live equipment later. For instance, we have a PA system and a 16-channel mixer. We use it for practices, we can use it for live, and the mixer is great for recording. It has several busses so we can send some channels to one computer, some to another computer, etc.

As for microphones, we mic the drums at practice and at shows (obviously) so those mics are usually a good investment.

sneakbobcat
11-06-2006, 11:59 AM
My band are in the middle of recording at the moment, we are recording a demo after a sound engineer saw us at a gig and thought we were pretty good so offered us some free sessions in a recording studio to his expense, so we have already spent around 7 hours in the studio and we will return a few more times to complete the demo, i'll show you the results if you want when we are done.

EvilCheeseWedge
11-06-2006, 12:25 PM
My band are in the middle of recording at the moment, we are recording a demo after a sound engineer saw us at a gig and thought we were pretty good so offered us some free sessions in a recording studio to his expense, so we have already spent around 7 hours in the studio and we will return a few more times to complete the demo, i'll show you the results if you want when we are done.
Sweet, you should definitely let us hear it :horns:

ChildrenofSodom
11-06-2006, 01:03 PM
Yeah..I think a metronome is what we need, at least for practicing. We were having trouble lining up...I will have to find my brothers...

EvilCheeseWedge
11-06-2006, 01:09 PM
Yeah..I think a metronome is what we need, at least for practicing. We were having trouble lining up...I will have to find my brothers...
Oh dude, metronomes are a must. Some people are really opposed to them though.

As an aside, I have a funny story. One of the drummers in my last band was named Eric. He was onboard for a month and couldn't keep time to save his life. After really working with him he would just refuse to work with a metronome and we just could not record or play songs properly, so we had to let him go. A few months later we split with our vocalist. This vocalist went on to start a band with Eric. Anyways, a few more months go by and we're on friendly terms with those guys again. I was talking to the vocalist who said Eric's a much better drummer now. The vocalist said Eric finally admitted the other day, "You know, I hate to say it, but those guys were right about the metronome."

Metronomes :fist:

ChildrenofSodom
11-06-2006, 01:17 PM
Yeah...my drumming and Brad's guitars just couldnt match up, playing by ear really sucks.....so...

sneakbobcat
11-06-2006, 01:20 PM
Metronomes, yes i guess so, but they are better for practicing individually. When recording use a click track. I know they are the same thing, but if you change the sound of it so it doesn't sound like artificial drums it's easier for the drummer and then once the drums are down and you have your guide track you're sorted.

ChildrenofSodom
11-06-2006, 01:23 PM
Metronomes, yes i guess so, but they are better for practicing individually. When recording use a click track. I know they are the same thing, but if you change the sound of it so it doesn't sound like artificial drums it's easier for the drummer and then once the drums are down and you have your guide track you're sorted.

well, we dont plan on recording while the metronome is on :eyes:....like...i play my drums, get them down solid, then Brad gets his guitar cleaner, the same with my brother, then we try altogether.

sneakbobcat
11-06-2006, 01:26 PM
well, we dont plan on recording while the metronome is on :eyes:....like...i play my drums, get them down solid, then Brad gets his guitar cleaner, the same with my brother, then we try altogether.

ofcourse.:party:

Div
11-06-2006, 02:13 PM
just record the drums first, then have brad listen to them on headphones while he records the guitar.

KillYourFace
11-06-2006, 02:32 PM
Bloody Scepter never used a fucking metronome

ChildrenofSodom
11-06-2006, 02:47 PM
just record the drums first, then have brad listen to them on headphones while he records the guitar.

well, that would work, but we need to have the shell of a song first. I'm not just going to record random beats and tell brad to write to it.

powerslave_85
11-06-2006, 03:42 PM
When I was in my high school band, we recorded stuff just with a mic that was plugged into our bass player's mini-disc player. Surprisingly, it turned out listenable.

ChildrenofSodom
11-06-2006, 03:54 PM
http://youtube.com/watch?v=dPDsVjQJbns

DethMaiden
11-06-2006, 03:59 PM
http://youtube.com/watch?v=dPDsVjQJbns

Haha, "performing"

ADD
11-06-2006, 04:15 PM
If anyone wants a copy of me and my friends demo recorded live on 2" analog tape PM me:party: :lol:

Maiden33
11-06-2006, 05:50 PM
Apparently my 2 and a half years of band experience gets overlooked. :(


Anyway. The best advice I can give is this:

Don't record until you're ready. REALLY ready. Just don't. Even if you think you are, wait like 6 months and then rethink it again.
The biggest mistake you can make is putting a lot of time and energy into something for a crap result. My band learned this the hard way. My friend who had a about twice as much time of experience as me at the time (summer of 2005) forewarned me with the same advice I'm giving you now. And at that time, my band had 8 songs and played almost a half dozen live shows. We didn't listen. We sounded good so we figured we should get some recordings done. It was a bad move. If we would've waited a few more months, it would've turned out better, but the recording's suffered cause we weren't so sure of ourselves at the time. Especially if you're doing it yourslef... which if you are (like we did), get a really good editing program (I suggest CoolEdit Pro) and find someone who actually knows what they're doing (outside of the band) to help you out. Even if you read the manual 10 times, believe me, you should seek at least somewhat proffesional help.

That's my best advice for the moment.