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powerslave_85
09-17-2012, 07:12 PM
I was thinking about this because of a post Jeff made on Facebook. I came to a realization: I think right now is the best time it's ever been to be a music fan/consumer. A few reasons why:
1. Being a casual fan is much more cost-effective
When I was a kid and I heard a song I liked, I had to buy the whole album. Yes, sometimes this would lead to a good discovery, but more often than not it was a waste of money. Nowadays you can choose your songs a la carte. You get what you want without the unwanted chaff.
2. Greater access to artists
Social media has made it much easier to keep in touch with your favorite bands. You can find out about tour dates and release dates within minutes. You're never out of the loop. Before the internet, if you didn't have any friends who were into the same bands as you, you were pretty much screwed.
3. Artists have more freedom
Want to do a digital-only album? Pay-what you want? Special pre-order bundle? Artists not only have more/easier ways of getting their music out there, but they also have more ways to offer their music to fans.

Sure, there are drawbacks to all of these things. Piracy still screws smaller artists. The easy access to music tends to make fans entitled and spoiled. Some of these conveniences take the "fun" out of it (though I think a lot of that is romanticized by nostalgia).

Thoughts?

BloodoftheKings
09-17-2012, 07:38 PM
This is the kinda shit I always tell people when they start whining about how "today's music sucks" and "they were born in the wrong generation". When it comes to music, I can't see why you would want to live in any other generation then the one where you can easily access music from any era for free.

illuminatus917
09-17-2012, 07:38 PM
Man, I agree with everything, especially #3. I love the variety of forms music is available in these days. Artistic bands present their music in artistic packages. The widespread use of bandcamps is very fan-friendly, and they're often managed directly by independent artists and not necessarily labels, giving bands a variety of ways to promote/offer/sell their music.

But I think it's the best time ever to be a music fan for more than just consumer purposes. Music is better right now than it's ever been. Especially post- the turn of the new millennium. The artistry is there. The innovation is there. Bands and genres are feeding off each other and the creativity just seems to be thriving. I used to be depressed because there were seven notes on the scale, excluding sharps and flats. With a finite number of notes, you can only achieve a finite number of chords, scales, etc. When people talked of "new music," I assumed it only sounded new to them because they hadn't listened to much music or didn't care much about music. However, after studying some of the modern-era composers like Brian Eno and John Cage, I realized that many more combinations are possible when adding in different variables, like symmetry, dynamics, and in Cage's case especially, the exploration of sound itself. Now, people are pulling apart beat patterns and sound waves and rearranging them into unique sounds never before created (unless they had synthesizers and computers in the past and we didn't know it).

And we've seen metal branch off in so many directions, I feel like there's constantly something new to be looking for. And that's a great feeling.

Yeah, music is in a good place right now. 


JRA
09-17-2012, 09:15 PM
2. Greater access to artists
Social media has made it much easier to keep in touch with your favorite bands.

Forget favorite bands, the internet has not only raised an awareness of an underground from decades ago thought to be long since forgotten, but has put them in the goddamn mainstream stores of America.

I remember discussing Under The Sign of the Black Mark with Brady and looking it up on Amazon at the time only to discover the cheapest copy was over 100 fucking dollars. Now Blood Fire Death is available in FYE for 9.99. Fucking new copies of Manowar albums are available in FYE now!

Martin Popoff, in his latest edition of his record collector's guide to the 80's, but out a fan polled top 100 best metal albums of the 80's list. He posed that the question would probably never be asked again because the answer would likely be the same in 2005 (when that edition was published) as it was in 98, 01 or 03. Bands like Kreator, Bathory and such were in the lower 90's but that's because nobody really knew who they were. Now you've got half of Kreator's audience being mankvill's age and old timers at Slayer shows shitting their pants because they see boys half their age wearing Overkill shirts.

I mean Christ, you have Decibel interviewing the guys from Warlord: a band so fucking obscure the only musical release they ever was a goddamn video soundtrack. Furthermore, thanks to blogpsot I have a goddamn demo by Tormentor, an 80's black metal band who's claim to fame is their singer joined Mayhem, and that the demo would have been turned into an album but Euronymus was killed before he could.

You want to know how much the internet has changed music? 10-12 years ago you were afraid to think negative aspects about Slayer's weakest albums. Now schmucks like me say Darkness Descends shits on Reign In Blood from a mesospheric height with no consequences. :D


When it comes to music, I can't see why you would want to live in any other generation then the one where you can easily access music from any era for free.

This too. People look at my taste and probably go "You would love to have been born in 1961." Fuck no! Just because 90% of my musical taste comes from the 70s and 80s doesn't mean I would want to live there (though I wouldn't mind a brief time travel to shack up with some groupies at Van Halen concerts :money: ).


Also also. I never in a million years thought Vinyl would ever become fashionable again. Vinyl was that goofy shit your parents listened to while slow dancing and watching Banana Spilts. I thought fucking 8-tracks and cassettes would make a comeback before that. Now you have machines that rip mp3's from vinyls. DAFUCK?!?

SomewhereInTime72
09-18-2012, 12:22 AM
This is the kinda shit I always tell people when they start whining about how "today's music sucks" and "they were born in the wrong generation". When it comes to music, I can't see why you would want to live in any other generation then the one where you can easily access music from any era for free.

Agreed. Though most of the complaints seem to be more about the state of currently popular music styles, and probably about wanting to see certain older bands live... those are sort of valid reasons.

But purely from a listening perspective, now is definitely the best. Hate modern music? You can still find more older music than you ever could have in previous times and it's all (optionally, since it's often readily available 'officially') free. Also it's so easy to find things now that I don't see how a person could hate modern music unless they aren't looking. It's still easy to find the few things you like. Kinda great for consumers. :party:

ravenheart
09-18-2012, 01:12 AM
Thoughts?

Just one. I don't see any of the things you said as benefits.

MPF
09-18-2012, 01:35 AM
It is really a double edged sword. On the plus side bands that wouldn't have gotten the exposure they deserve if it wasn't for the internet. For bigger bands it does fuck them out of the more money they could have had. If the smaller bands had the opprotunities that bigger bands had, it would fuck them over as well. But it gets their name out there, which you can look at again as a double edge sword.

I for one am neutral on illegal downloading. Of course I am in the small percentage of people who can promos from the labels. I see the need for it and the good and bad it causes. I guess I just look at it from the paraphrased Devin Townsend Quotes. "I am for illegal downloading, and I hope you like what you hear, and if you don't that's cool too. but if you want me to be able to tour, buy the album and buy some merch."

ravenheart
09-18-2012, 02:34 AM
It is really a double edged sword. On the plus side bands that wouldn't have gotten the exposure they deserve if it wasn't for the internet. For bigger bands it does fuck them out of the more money they could have had. If the smaller bands had the opprotunities that bigger bands had, it would fuck them over as well. But it gets their name out there, which you can look at again as a double edge sword.

It makes it easier for small bands to get known, yes. But they can't make any money and actually carry on, so it's really not a positive in the least.

If the industry had got a lock-down on digital music technology at the beginning, so that it was only used for providing samples/streams/listening opportunities to fans so they could make more informed decisions on buying records and attending tours, then it would have been the best thing to happen to music in decades. They didn't, so it isn't. It's actually bordering on the worst thing.

Bands could have had all that new exposure and the like we're all talking about as positive impacts without losing money, without tours fucking smaller bands with stupid buy-ons because the bigger bands can't make money from records anymore, without labels withdrawing all tour funding and the bands having to charge silly ticket prices, without recorded music being watered down with shitty digital-only releases because people can't afford to release it properly, and so on.

The negative impacts of the digital age FAR outweigh the positives because the positives, but very few people can ever see beyond "HURR, I CAN HAS MUSIC FOR FREEEE!!".

In metal, things are AS bad. The evidence of that is more metal bands getting in album charts. Metal fans possibly more than most have stuck to supporting the artists. I think metal fans have always had a better grasp on how the industry works than most genres, probably because metal has always been such an underground thing that they've been closer to it than pop fans are. Most of the bands I talk to don't feel quite as threatened by the declining industry at the moment as I thought they would, because the fans are, for now, still there. The slope is still running downwards, though.

ravenheart
09-18-2012, 02:47 AM
I love the variety of forms music is available in these days.


On a personal note as a consumer of recorded music, I don't. I hate it.

I'm tired of small bands and labels either having to charge insane amounts of money for their CDs, or not being able to release their music properly at all because they can't afford it, or the more cost effective way of releasing it has become a cheap knockoff with no overheads.

And I'm tired of digital music in general degrading and devaluing the concept of a music collection.

Although, all of this is down to two main factors really. People are cheap, and people are lazy.

powerslave_85
09-18-2012, 03:15 AM
I'm tired of small bands and labels either having to charge insane amounts of money for their CDsI've heard you talk about this before, and I really don't know what you're talking about. Is it a UK thing? Because I haven't seen an appreciable difference in CD prices over the last 15 years, whether it be in big-box retail, independent record stores, or from the labels themselves.

IrritatedTrout
09-18-2012, 04:31 AM
Honestly, I don't know how to feel about the whole issue of illegal downloading. I can see some positives in it and some negatives. All I know is I love my music collection so I'll keep buying as long as physical product is available.

I do love the fact that tour information is so readily available through the internet now, what the hell did you do in the 80's if you wanted to find out about a show? Especially one in another city. Though I'd kill to see bands back in their heyday.

mastodon421
09-18-2012, 04:49 AM
I was thinking about this because of a post Jeff made on Facebook. I came to a realization: I think right now is the best time it's ever been to be a music fan/consumer. A few reasons why:
1. Being a casual fan is much more cost-effective
When I was a kid and I heard a song I liked, I had to buy the whole album. Yes, sometimes this would lead to a good discovery, but more often than not it was a waste of money. Nowadays you can choose your songs a la carte. You get what you want without the unwanted chaff.
2. Greater access to artists
Social media has made it much easier to keep in touch with your favorite bands. You can find out about tour dates and release dates within minutes. You're never out of the loop. Before the internet, if you didn't have any friends who were into the same bands as you, you were pretty much screwed.
3. Artists have more freedom
Want to do a digital-only album? Pay-what you want? Special pre-order bundle? Artists not only have more/easier ways of getting their music out there, but they also have more ways to offer their music to fans.

Sure, there are drawbacks to all of these things. Piracy still screws smaller artists. The easy access to music tends to make fans entitled and spoiled. Some of these conveniences take the "fun" out of it (though I think a lot of that is romanticized by nostalgia).

Thoughts?

This is brilliantly articulated, I agree 1000%. Well done man.

hot_turkey_ed
09-18-2012, 05:04 AM
Slideshow: State Of The Music Business (http://digitalcowboys.com/music-industry-2012/)

Worth looking at in the context of this discussion.

Sanitarium78
09-18-2012, 06:37 AM
what the hell did you do in the 80's if you wanted to find out about a show?

Local newspapers, music magazines, record stores, MTV, the radio.

The info was still out there back then. You just had to do a little more work to find it. Unlike now where all of our lazy asses can just type whatever band we want into a search engine and you'll know in a minute weather they're coming close or not:D

Dextrimental
09-18-2012, 07:18 AM
I agree on all counts. These days, being a musician and putting music out there has never been easier. Band's don't need your conventional record deal to get out there anymore. Granted, for now that's still where the living is, but that's dwindling. It's going in the direction of touring/merchandise/lessons, all straight from the band to the fan. Band's won't ever be Metallica or Rolling Stones again, but they will make a living without the business middle man.

DethMaiden
09-18-2012, 07:31 AM
I was thinking about this because of a post Jeff made on Facebook. I came to a realization: I think right now is the best time it's ever been to be a music fan/consumer. A few reasons why:
1. Being a casual fan is much more cost-effective
When I was a kid and I heard a song I liked, I had to buy the whole album. Yes, sometimes this would lead to a good discovery, but more often than not it was a waste of money. Nowadays you can choose your songs a la carte. You get what you want without the unwanted chaff.
2. Greater access to artists
Social media has made it much easier to keep in touch with your favorite bands. You can find out about tour dates and release dates within minutes. You're never out of the loop. Before the internet, if you didn't have any friends who were into the same bands as you, you were pretty much screwed.
3. Artists have more freedom
Want to do a digital-only album? Pay-what you want? Special pre-order bundle? Artists not only have more/easier ways of getting their music out there, but they also have more ways to offer their music to fans.

Sure, there are drawbacks to all of these things. Piracy still screws smaller artists. The easy access to music tends to make fans entitled and spoiled. Some of these conveniences take the "fun" out of it (though I think a lot of that is romanticized by nostalgia).

Thoughts?

1. Totally agree, and I'll take it one step further -- being truly "casual" about something means I'll probably listen to it on Spotify when I want and never move past that stage. It underpays the artist, but it does pay them. And when I do want to buy something that I truly love, I'm more likely to go whole-hog, 180 gram double vinyl with expanded artwork, whatever the case might be. So again, the artists who I really want to reward, I'm rewarding the shit out of.

2. I got into music in a big way for the first time about 10 years ago and I was going strictly off shit I read in books and magazines about music and from posters on the IMBB. (No wonder the bands I first explored after Maiden were Blind Guardian and Helloween.) I'll take this present music media environment over that any day.

3. True to a degree, but I think labels are still crucial here. Granted, I work for one, but you can't just be a band and put out whatever you want. It's cost-prohibitive to do anything more elaborate than a digital album if you want to tour, and labels also bring with them name recognition that makes them carefully curate your roster. Hell, I'll listen to anything on Profound Lore, Southern Lord and Relapse even if I've never heard of it. Can't say the same about "any atmospheric black metal album" or the like -- there's just too much.

But in general, yes, this is a perfect time as a consumer, and now having worked on the producer-side for about six months, it's been fascinating to watch how distribution has adapted to accommodate this. From the inside looking out, I can say that in the six months I've been at Secretly Canadian I've witnessed four or five new hires, and this is coming from an independent label group in the middle of the fly-over zone. Things aren't as bad as some people would have you believe. You just have to be smart enough to run a business in a changing time.

illuminatus917
09-18-2012, 10:02 AM
On a personal note as a consumer of recorded music, I don't. I hate it.

I'm tired of small bands and labels either having to charge insane amounts of money for their CDs, or not being able to release their music properly at all because they can't afford it, or the more cost effective way of releasing it has become a cheap knockoff with no overheads.

And I'm tired of digital music in general degrading and devaluing the concept of a music collection.

Although, all of this is down to two main factors really. People are cheap, and people are lazy.

One of the first things I thought when reading the OP was, "ravenheart is going to disagree with everything posted here."

Indeed. ;)

I'll reiterate what Powerslave said though, where are the outrageous prices? Barring shopping for CDs at FYE, Best Buy or Barnes & Noble (or the UK equivalent, whatever that may be), most of which don't carry much I'm interested in anyway, prices across the board seem pretty reasonable right now. Small bands generally charge very little for their music, labels charge a tad more, but I haven't paid more than $15 for a CD in a long time (excluding shipping), years even. Often vinyl is no more expensive than CD, unless it comes in deluxe packaging of some kind or if it's double. And often these releases are more personalized and include more than they used to. A lot of bands write personal notes of appreciation, include patches, posters, candles, maps, photographs, razors, etc. at no noticeable extra charge just to try to reach out to the consumer and offer them more (which in marketing terms is called an "in-pack premium"); seemingly an appreciative gesture just for buying the music in the first place.

So quite the opposite really, bands seem to be reaching out and making their products as affordable and cost-productive as they can without losing their shirts. These are consumer benefits.

As far as digital music degrading physical collections, I've learned that almost all bands worth a shit release their music in some physical medium. In fact I can't think of a single instance where I wanted a physical copy of a band's material and couldn't find it. And I listen to a lot of independent artists, so expecting this to be an issue wouldn't be unreasonable, as compared to signed artists. In my experience though, it's not. So this might hold weight if you're talking about rap or hip hop or some genre of music I'm not familiar with, but for the most part it seems metal is very consumer friendly if you're looking to "collect" it.

powerslave_85
09-18-2012, 10:36 AM
In fact, Best Buy is one of, if not the cheapest major retailers when it comes to music. A very big chunk of their CD inventory is $9.99 these days. Even FYE is pretty reasonable for the most part.

illuminatus917
09-18-2012, 10:40 AM
Even FYE is pretty reasonable for the most part.

Since when? I used to only buy things there if they were used, it was the only way to get a reasonable price.

IrritatedTrout
09-18-2012, 10:47 AM
In fact, Best Buy is one of, if not the cheapest major retailers when it comes to music. A very big chunk of their CD inventory is $9.99 these days. Even FYE is pretty reasonable for the most part.

I was gonna say that. Best Buy has a pretty big 4.99 and 7.99 section and most other things are only around 9.99 I believe. They're pretty reasonable.

slapguitarer
09-18-2012, 10:56 AM
I got the new HoF from Best Buy for $7.99. They're cool in my book.

adamclark52
09-18-2012, 11:02 AM
I agree 100% with the original comment about more accessability to artists. The reason I got into bands like Suffocation and Napalm Death so late was because when I was a teenager in the 1990's there was no internet. So to hear a new band you either had to do it through the grapevine, at a show or take a gamble. I was never willing to shell out $20 on a CD of a band that I wasn't even sure I'd like. Now if I'm interested I have so many avenues to get a sample.

And the whole downfall of the music industry has hurt all artists but metal bands never made money anyways, so it hasn't changed that much for them. Sure, Celine Dion is suffering but Carcass are scraping by just like they always did.

JRA
09-18-2012, 12:21 PM
I got the new HoF from Best Buy for $7.99. They're cool in my book.

I got the goddamn remastered first album from there. Something I thought would only hold interest to online catalogs and dying record store go-ers. But at Best Buy?

powerslave_85
09-18-2012, 12:24 PM
Since when? I used to only buy things there if they were used, it was the only way to get a reasonable price.
Some rare stuff (mostly metal) gets into $17-$18 range, but most stuff is $10-$15. At least at the one here.

mankvill
09-18-2012, 12:27 PM
Now you've got half of Kreator's audience being mankvill's age

shut up, i turn 14 in 2 weeks!

JRA
09-18-2012, 12:30 PM
shut up, i turn 14 in 2 weeks!

:lol: :lol:

John The Drummer
09-18-2012, 12:34 PM
I can't wait to throw in my two cents once I get a chance!

In a nutshell for now, there are too many elitists and hipsters due to how easy it is to find bands these days :finger:

dcmetal108
09-18-2012, 12:44 PM
I got the goddamn remastered first album from there. Something I thought would only hold interest to online catalogs and dying record store go-ers. But at Best Buy?


The best buy near me sucks for metal unless it is huge name stuff. Even then they don't get alot of new metal. They have tons of remastered metal for $5 though.

I mean even Hot Topic sucks for music now. They'll get the new Lil Wayne and whatever Disney shit is being pushed but they won't get even something like The Ghost Inside or Every Time I Die which are bands they use to push.

JRA
09-18-2012, 08:31 PM
Eh, I wouldn't say the local Best Buy was good for metal, I was just shocked the first High On Fire album was there.

MPF
09-18-2012, 09:42 PM
It makes it easier for small bands to get known, yes. But they can't make any money and actually carry on, so it's really not a positive in the least.

If the industry had got a lock-down on digital music technology at the beginning, so that it was only used for providing samples/streams/listening opportunities to fans so they could make more informed decisions on buying records and attending tours, then it would have been the best thing to happen to music in decades. They didn't, so it isn't. It's actually bordering on the worst thing.

Bands could have had all that new exposure and the like we're all talking about as positive impacts without losing money, without tours fucking smaller bands with stupid buy-ons because the bigger bands can't make money from records anymore, without labels withdrawing all tour funding and the bands having to charge silly ticket prices, without recorded music being watered down with shitty digital-only releases because people can't afford to release it properly, and so on.

The negative impacts of the digital age FAR outweigh the positives because the positives, but very few people can ever see beyond "HURR, I CAN HAS MUSIC FOR FREEEE!!".

In metal, things are AS bad. The evidence of that is more metal bands getting in album charts. Metal fans possibly more than most have stuck to supporting the artists. I think metal fans have always had a better grasp on how the industry works than most genres, probably because metal has always been such an underground thing that they've been closer to it than pop fans are. Most of the bands I talk to don't feel quite as threatened by the declining industry at the moment as I thought they would, because the fans are, for now, still there. The slope is still running downwards, though.

That's why I pointed out why its a double edged sword. there is no real winning or losing in this position because its become a damned if you do, damned if you don't type environment.

illuminatus917
09-18-2012, 09:54 PM
That's why I pointed out why its a double edged sword. there is no real winning or losing in this position because its become a damned if you do, damned if you don't type environment.

Everything is damned to some extent now, isn't it.

XDoomsayerX
09-19-2012, 01:59 PM
Accessibility and easiness so yeah I dig it

John The Drummer
09-19-2012, 03:44 PM
1. Being a casual fan is much more cost-effective
When I was a kid and I heard a song I liked, I had to buy the whole album. Yes, sometimes this would lead to a good discovery, but more often than not it was a waste of money. Nowadays you can choose your songs a la carte. You get what you want without the unwanted chaff.
2. Greater access to artists
Social media has made it much easier to keep in touch with your favorite bands. You can find out about tour dates and release dates within minutes. You're never out of the loop. Before the internet, if you didn't have any friends who were into the same bands as you, you were pretty much screwed.
3. Artists have more freedom
Want to do a digital-only album? Pay-what you want? Special pre-order bundle? Artists not only have more/easier ways of getting their music out there, but they also have more ways to offer their music to fans.


1. This is a very good point, but then you have the casual fans that ONLY want to hear the singles/popular songs and don't even give the rest of the album/discography a chance. I would much rather buy a whole album and risk having shitty songs than just limit myself.

2. This is very true, it is far easier to keep in touch with the bands you like, and easier to find out new bands as well, which is always good. At the same time however, it leads to a ton of douchebags/elitists. It isn't bad to discover new and undergroud bands at all, as I am in an unsigned band myself, but when people use that as their advantage to make them seem more TR00 and KVLT, then it is just pathetic. I don't care if you downloaded NEKRO HROTHGAR SVARTOREO's new demo that they recorded on an answering machine, I haven't heard of them, nor care for shitty quality music.

3. Can't really add much more to this as you hit the nail on the head. You don't need a record label to be known anymore with sites like YouTube and ReverbNation and the right people supporting you. It's great to just upload a few songs, have them for free to sample, then leading fans to want more, and buying an entire album.

dcmetal108
09-19-2012, 07:56 PM
So hearing the debate about the openers for Hatebreed between the US and UK(ish) tour got me thinking.

People often don't realize that sure the openers may be kinda random and not sound like the headliner but at the end of the day they are going to put bands on there that can draw a crowd. If H2O and Agnostic Front were opening the US tour I doubt they would pull in a huge draw like Whitechapel can, therefore shows would sell poorly and / or venues downgraded.


//// end random rant

Dextrimental
10-07-2012, 10:16 AM
So hearing the debate about the openers for Hatebreed between the US and UK(ish) tour got me thinking.

People often don't realize that sure the openers may be kinda random and not sound like the headliner but at the end of the day they are going to put bands on there that can draw a crowd. If H2O and Agnostic Front were opening the US tour I doubt they would pull in a huge draw like Whitechapel can, therefore shows would sell poorly and / or venues downgraded.


//// end random rant

Well, there's also availability of the band for the tour, the agents the bands are using not getting along, the balance between the bands in terms of drawing power. Lots to consider for these sort of tours.

Band management is an interesting thing to study. Not something I want to do as a job per se, but it interesting!

TheWildAndTheYoung
12-17-2012, 03:10 PM
There are some great things this age has to offer,like music accessibility,quick and reliable band info,etc.,but some great things of the 70s and 80s have been lost.For one thing,I would like for more people these days to get into buying the "whole" album rather then just buying the latest single,because now you have people who say their "fans" of artists,but only know one or two songs by them.I would like for 70s-80s sounding rock and metal to make a comeback to rock radio (and maybe even top 40 radio),because It would be awesome if more of my friends like the bands I liked,but that's just my opinion.Of course I would also like to have concerts go back to being cheaper so I can go see them more often,but with today's industry I'm afraid that won't happen.One very positive thing I like is that I see lots of kids around my age(I'm 14),and younger,going to concerts I go to,unfortunately my friends aren't included though.Another really cool thing is that when I go to a concert like Def Leppard,Poison,or Motley Crue,I feel as if I'm transported back to the 80s. On a side note,I would have loved to see bands like Van Halen and Aerosmith in there glory days.

dcmetal108
12-17-2012, 03:44 PM
There are some great things this age has to offer,like music accessibility,quick and reliable band info,etc.,but some great things of the 70s and 80s have been lost.For one thing,I would like for more people these days to get into buying the "whole" album rather then just buying the latest single,because now you have people who say their "fans" of artists,but only know one or two songs by them.I would like for 70s-80s sounding rock and metal to make a comeback to rock radio (and maybe even top 40 radio),because It would be awesome if more of my friends like the bands I liked,but that's just my opinion.Of course I would also like to have concerts go back to being cheaper so I can go see them more often,but with today's industry I'm afraid that won't happen.One very positive thing I like is that I see lots of kids around my age(I'm 14),and younger,going to concerts I go to,unfortunately my friends aren't included though.Another really cool thing is that when I go to a concert like Def Leppard,Poison,or Motley Crue,I feel as if I'm transported back to the 80s. On a side note,I would have loved to see bands like Van Halen and Aerosmith in there glory days.


Even back in what you consider "the day" you could still buy singles though, they were called 40" vinyl's.

Also about going back to shows being cheaper unless you are going to a fest or a arena show most shows are reasonably priced. The most I've ever played for a club show was like $40 and that's in venues that hold around 5,000 people. Only arena tours, amphitheaters, and some fests are expensive. Hell even cheap seats at Mayhem Fest or a general admission ticket to Warped Tour isn't that expensive. Widen what you listen to and you will find a shit ton of shows you can go to for under $20.

Plus rock and metal that sounds like the 70's and 80's will never come back enough to be on the radio, ever.

treghet
12-17-2012, 03:59 PM
they were called 40" vinyl's.

:lol:

BloodoftheKings
12-17-2012, 04:03 PM
they were called 40" vinyl's.

http://i2.kym-cdn.com/photos/images/original/000/131/962/1307580107001.png

dcmetal108
12-17-2012, 04:17 PM
:lol:

God damn it!

Eating, watching a movie, and typing on the computer always leads to an error! :mad::mad::mad::mad::mad::mad:

(And now any valid points I made are invalid :lol:)

It's okay folks, I'm walking away with my tail between my legs. :(

slapguitarer
12-17-2012, 04:46 PM
http://i2.kym-cdn.com/photos/images/original/000/131/962/1307580107001.png

:lol:
:lol::lol:
:lol::lol::lol:

TheWildAndTheYoung
12-17-2012, 05:38 PM
Even back in what you consider "the day" you could still buy singles though, they were called 40" vinyl's.

Also about going back to shows being cheaper unless you are going to a fest or a arena show most shows are reasonably priced. The most I've ever played for a club show was like $40 and that's in venues that hold around 5,000 people. Only arena tours, amphitheaters, and some fests are expensive. Hell even cheap seats at Mayhem Fest or a general admission ticket to Warped Tour isn't that expensive. Widen what you listen to and you will find a shit ton of shows you can go to for under $20.

Plus rock and metal that sounds like the 70's and 80's will never come back enough to be on the radio, ever.
I know the club venues and even ampitheaters are reasonably priced,but it's the arena shows that I'm talking about.And I will always have hope that it will come back to the radio,don't stop believin' man.

BloodoftheKings
12-17-2012, 05:41 PM
I don't see why it matters what gets played on the radio anymore. I only really hear the radio when i'm at a restaurant or a store. Even if the stuff on the radio was all good I would still prefer to use my ipod in the car.

TheWildAndTheYoung
12-17-2012, 05:44 PM
I don't see why it matters what gets played on the radio anymore. I only really hear the radio when i'm at a restaurant or a store. Even if the stuff on the radio was all good I would still prefer to use my ipod in the car.
I feel like you do,but I was saying it would be cool if it was on the radio again so my friends that only listen to radio could be familiar with the bands I like

dcmetal108
12-17-2012, 06:17 PM
I mean technically the music you want on the radio is on the radio, it's just satilette radio. They have a channel made just for it.

TheWildAndTheYoung
12-17-2012, 07:23 PM
I mean technically the music you want on the radio is on the radio, it's just satilette radio. They have a channel made just for it.
not where I live,we only have two rock stations,one for soft rock and one for hard rock(they do good,but it's rarely anything but the hits)

SomewhereInTime72
12-17-2012, 09:28 PM
i'm pretty sure they have satellite radio where you live

kalfitegrdan
12-17-2012, 11:37 PM
i'm pretty sure they have satellite radio where you live

:lol:

Also, correct me if I'm wrong, but isn't it more inflation/the economy that dictates the ticket prices, not the current state of the music industry?

dcmetal108
12-18-2012, 06:54 AM
i'm pretty sure they have satellite radio where you live

This. Seriously on trips I've drove through desert and mountains where even a gas station was 50 miles away and still had satellite radio.

TheWildAndTheYoung
12-18-2012, 10:03 AM
i'm pretty sure they have satellite radio where you live
Nope

IrritatedTrout
12-18-2012, 10:47 AM
L O L

dcmetal108
12-18-2012, 02:02 PM
Nope

Are you by some chance located either in the middle of a mountain or 500 feet underground?

TheWildAndTheYoung
12-18-2012, 02:11 PM
Are you by some chance located either in the middle of a mountain or 500 feet underground?
yep

RampinUp46
12-28-2012, 02:41 PM
For those of you with some time to kill reading about recording contracts, here's one of the few Metal Sucks articles that doesn't bite ass:

http://www.metalsucks.net/2009/10/01/tiberian-vocalizations-cormorants-arthur-von-nagel-gives-you-the-anatomy-of-a-record-contract