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DethMaiden
12-21-2010, 09:22 PM
For a number of reasons, 2010 was the biggest movie year of my life. My work with the student newspaper thrust me into more conversations about movies than I've ever been in before, and I found myself becoming extremely aware of what was happening in film at all times. In July, I decided to start blogging the IMDb Top 250, and between those movies I've tried to find the time to watch as many others as possible. I may not be a bona fide film critic, but I certainly watch as many movies as one.

In any case, my overwhelming awareness of 2010's films has led me to do something a little unconventional with my list. I'm going to put together a semi-comprehensive list of 2010 movies, break it into a categories, and end with my top 10 list, counting backwards. I say semi-comprehensive because there's tons of 2010 movies that I'm not quite interested enough in to put into a category or write a blurb about. Still, this will be a pretty hefty endeavor, so please bear with me, and feel free to comment at will.

(Note: All movies included saw their first theatrical release, however limited, in the United States in 2010. I don't go abroad or go to festivals to see movies, so a few of these were first seen in 2009, but I couldn't have possibly seen them.)

(Note 2: Anything that I didn't see but plan to I didn't think had a legitimate shot at breaking into my top ten. That's why it got pushed to the back-burner. Once I catch up I might find myself wanting to amend my list, but for now, let's say that's not going to happen.)

Documentaries I didn't see but want and intend to:
The Tillman Story: NFL fans basically know the Tillman story, but a whole film on it would have filled in the blanks.
Inside Job: Looks like the film version of Andrew Ross Sorkin's Too Big to Fail, one of my favorite nonfiction books of all time.
Last Train Home: It made our best of 2010 list at WEEKEND. That's all I've got.
Oceans: I wanted to be a marine biologist when I was 6. A doc that takes place entirely underwater would have found that inner child and reassured him.
Babies: If the only thing it has going for it is cuteness...I might still want to see it.
45365: There have been "a day in the life of a small town" documentaries before, but a) Roger Ebert loved this one and b) it takes place in Sidney, Ohio, a town a mere fifteen miles north of my hometown.

Fake documentaries I didn't see but want and intend to:
I'm Still Here: I still think Joaquin Phoenix should get an Oscar nomination.
Catfish: Hopefully knowing the ending doesn't make it completely unwatchable.

Wide-release movies from the first three months of the year, all of which I sort of meant to see but didn't, that have since lost my interest:
Youth in Revolt: Michael Cera playing kinda-not-Michael Cera. Funny, maybe?
Extraordinary Measures: "I already work around the clock!"
Edge of Darkness: I like redemption stories and I thought this could have been Mel's.
From Paris With Love: John Travolta looks cool bald. That was my rationale for wanting to see this.
The Wolfman: Great cast, a summer movie released not-in-summer.
Cop Out: Kevin Smith, Tracy Morgan, Bruce Willis...what could go wrong?
Alice in Wonderland: I basically hate Tim Burton, but I'm still weirdly attracted to his films.
Hot Tub Time Machine: The title should have been enough to get me out to this one.
Clash of the Titans: Got bullied by critics into skipping what looked like a pretty fun fantasy flick.

Films I was excited for when I heard they existed that I decided to skip when I saw the trailers:
Jonah Hex: Josh Brolin and John Malkovich in an adaptation of a comic book Western scored by Mastodon. Awesome, right? The first "F" I've seen the AV Club give, an 81-minute final cut, and that horrible, horrible trailer suggest otherwise.
The Last Airbender: Nickelodeon's Avatar is one of the only non-comedy cartoon series I've ever watched, so the prospect of a live action version naturally intrigued me. Did I still feel this way after I saw the trailer? Nope. Disaster.
The Tourist: Okay, the universal panning from critics had more to do with it than the trailer, but a Depp-Jolie movie should be good, and, at least right now, clearly isn't.
Hereafter: When this was in early development and all I knew about it was that it starred Matt Damon and was directed by Clint Eastwood, I wanted to see it. Then the trailer came out and I learned that it was like if Crash – a movie I hate – required you to believe in an afterlife. No thanks.

Family films that I didn't see and have no intentions of seeing:
Alpha and Omega: Worst trailer of the year. YouTube at your own peril.
Shrek Forever After: Four Shrek movies?! Four!?!
The Karate Kid: I would only see this if I learned that Jaden Smith whips his hair back and forth in it.
Ramona and Beezus: Even a not-quite-of-age Selena Gomez can't make this look fun.
Harry Potter and the Deathly Hallows Part 1: Maybe it's a family film, maybe it's not. I stopped reading the books after Book 3 and I stopped watching the movies after Movie 1.
Percy Jackson & The Olympians: The Lightning Thief: Is this even a thing?
Tooth Fairy: You're kidding me.
Cats and Dogs: The Revenge of Kitty Galore: No, seriously, you're fucking with me.
Nanny McPhee Returns: There's no way this is real.
The Spy Next Door: I fucking quit.

Family films that I didn't see but still plan to:
Despicable Me: Steve Carell's presence, along with the two funny gags in the trailer involving the little girl ("It's so fluffy I could die" and "Does this count as annoying?") made me want to see it; the annoyingly flaunted 3D (A roller coaster? Seriously?) and, let's be honest, fucking terrible title, stopped me.
Megamind: I love superhero movies, and this one honestly looks better than The Incredibles to me. I can't give you a real reason why I didn't check it out, but I plan to on DVD.
Tangled: Wasn't interested until multiple people, including my ten-year-old sister who's an expert on the subject, told me it was a "Disney princess classic." Guess it'll be a rental.

Movies that critics generally loved that I have no interest in seeing:
127 Hours: This is the biggest one for this category. I saw the 60 Minutes special on Aron Ralston after he wrote his book, so I know the story well. The movie, from what I can tell, does two things I don't like: It tries to convince me that James Franco looks like Aron Ralston (he doesn't), and it makes me watch him cut his arm off. (I'm not scared I'll faint, I just don't particularly think it's necessary.) Danny Boyle is an auteur, but this is one I just have no interest in.
The Ghost Writer: I think Roman Polanski is just about on par with Wes Anderson as the most overrated director in Hollywood. (Okay, not in Hollywood. They don't let child rapists live there.) I know that if I saw The Ghost Writer I'd probably like it at least a little, but it just doesn't have any factors working for it that would compel me to do so.
The Fighter: Jesus Christ, could this look any more cliché? Rocky was tedious enough in Philadelphia; I don't need to see it in Boston.
Greenberg: The whole "terrible mainstream comedy actor doing an indie film" thing has never appealed to me. This looks like Eternal Sunshine of the Spotless Mind or Punch-Drunk Love all over again.
The Town: Did we really need Ben Affleck to direct his own version of The Departed? Aside from the very cool nun and skull masks and the presence of Jeremy Renner, this one looks boring as hell.

Movies that critics generally loved that I didn't get the chance to see but assume I eventually will:
Blue Valentine: The NC-17 rating may have dissuaded some people, but it actually served to insert a move that otherwise wouldn't have been on my radar into my consciousness. The trailer is beautiful, and while I'm not compelled to see it immediately and don't think it could breach my top ten, it does look good.
A Prophet: I don't know anything about it other than it was nominated for a Best Foreign Language Film Oscar and a lot of people whose tastes I respect enjoyed it. That's probably enough for me to eventually get around to watching it.
I Am Love: British actress Tilda Swinton playing a Russian character who speaks heavily accented Italian is enough to make me want to see it. The plot doesn't sound that interesting, but her performance is probably brilliant.

Movies that critics didn't exactly adore that I'd still like to eventually see:
The Human Centipede: First Sequence: If you know the premise of the movie, you know exactly why it's intriguing. Will it suck? Probably, but I want to see exactly how it goes about sucking.
Salt: Sure, it sounds like every other spy movie ever, but it stars Angelina Jolie, whom I love, and hey, who doesn't like a well-executed spy film?
Easy A: 2010 was a pretty awful year for straight-up comedy movies, and this looks like it could be a worthy successor to Mean Girls. It's a shame I haven't had a chance to watch it yet.
The Girl Who Kicked the Hornet's Nest: Through a series of unfortunate circumstances and weather complications, I didn't get to see the third movie in the Millennium Trilogy when I thought I was going to. Critics would probably say that that's okay, but when I start a trilogy and enjoy its first two parts, I like to finish it.
The Chronicles of Narnia: The Voyage of the Dawn Treader: I never saw Prince Caspian, but The Lion, the Witch and the Wardrobe is one of my favorite fantasy movies of all time.
Date Night: I watch The Office and 30 Rock every week, so even if this movie sucks, seeing Steve Carell and Tina Fey riff for ninety minutes would be pretty fun.

Tomorrow, I'll start posting on movies I actually saw - documentaries and movies I didn't like first, and maybe non-top-ten movies I did like if I have time.

DethMaiden
12-21-2010, 09:55 PM
Also, if for God knows what reason, you want to know my take on a movie that you don't see listed (wait until after I post the movies I've seen, duh), feel free to let me know. I probably have an opinion on everything that came out this year. :lol:

mastodon421
12-22-2010, 06:59 AM
Intresting, I'm looking forward to seeing your picks.

ravenheart
12-22-2010, 08:29 AM
My list of movies I wanted to see but didn't would comfortably outnumber my list of movies I did see.

Funnily enough though, most of the ones I did see are listed above ;)

Indestructible
12-22-2010, 09:10 AM
The Human Centipede: First Sequence:

That movie sucked, as do all horror and suspense films. I thought this film would be interesting, I thought cool a human centipede how will that look how does this mad scientist go about making a human centipede. It was a real let down.

DethMaiden
12-22-2010, 09:11 AM
That movie sucked, as do all horror and suspense films. I thought this film would be interesting, I thought cool a human centipede how will that look how does this mad scientist go about making a human centipede. It was a real let down.

Now this I doubt.

Sepultura69
12-22-2010, 09:23 AM
That movie sucked, as do all horror and suspense films.

WRONG

street_burial
12-22-2010, 09:24 AM
the worst movie i watched this year was 'the book of eli' i fucking despise that movie

Indestructible
12-22-2010, 09:31 AM
WRONG

I see nothing special about horror films. Five teens go camping and get slaughtered by some insane guy with an axe. That is how I some up all horror movies I see because that is all that goes on in the horror movies I have seen.

DethMaiden
12-22-2010, 09:33 AM
You've lost your movie talking privileges, so please stay out of my thread. Not because I disagree with you, but because you're fucking willfully ignorant. I'm not even the biggest horror fan in the world anymore, but anyone with a pulse knows that all horror movies aren't like that. Hell, I've only seen one (Friday the 13th) that's even remotely like that, and I've seen a lot of horror movies.

ChildrenofSodom
12-22-2010, 09:36 AM
Easy A was alright for a bored Friday night flick. And Date Night was pretty funny, just because of Fey and Carrell. (And Kunis)

Sepultura69
12-22-2010, 10:15 AM
I see nothing special about horror films. Five teens go camping and get slaughtered by some insane guy with an axe. That is how I some up all horror movies I see because that is all that goes on in the horror movies I have seen.

You obviously don't know anything about Horror films LET ALONE GREAT horror films. You've been watching way too many "I know what you did last summer/SCREAM" bullshit. :cool:

Here is a good example of a perfect horror movie. I grew up with this film through most of my childhood.


Easily one of the greatest horror/scifi movies ever made....damn this movie brings back so much memories
http://filmtracks.files.wordpress.com/2007/07/the-thing.jpg

Natrlhi
12-22-2010, 12:05 PM
You've lost your movie talking privileges, so please stay out of my thread. Not because I disagree with you, but because you're fucking willfully ignorant. I'm not even the biggest horror fan in the world anymore, but anyone with a pulse knows that all horror movies aren't like that. Hell, I've only seen one (Friday the 13th) that's even remotely like that, and I've seen a lot of horror movies.This. All of it. Well put, Brad.

Date Night was pretty funny, just because of Fey and Carrell. (And Kunis):agree:

Here is a good example of a perfect horror movie...
http://filmtracks.files.wordpress.com/2007/07/the-thing.jpgYour recent streak of accidentally saying shit that I actually agree with, continues... ;)

Natrlhi
12-22-2010, 12:25 PM
Youth in Revolt: Michael Cera playing kinda-not-Michael Cera. Funny, maybe?
Edge of Darkness: I like redemption stories and I thought this could have been Mel's.
Hot Tub Time Machine: The title should have been enough to get me out to this one.
Clash of the Titans: Got bullied by critics into skipping what looked like a pretty fun fantasy flick.
Despicable Me: Steve Carell's presence, along with the two funny gags in the trailer involving the little girl ("It's so fluffy I could die" and "Does this count as annoying?") made me want to see it; the annoyingly flaunted 3D (A roller coaster? Seriously?) and, let's be honest, fucking terrible title, stopped me.
Tangled: Wasn't interested until multiple people, including my ten-year-old sister who's an expert on the subject, told me it was a "Disney princess classic." Guess it'll be a rental.
The Human Centipede: If you know the premise of the movie, you know exactly why it's intriguing. Will it suck? Probably, but I want to see exactly how it goes about sucking.
Salt: Sure, it sounds like every other spy movie ever, but it stars Angelina Jolie, whom I love, and hey, who doesn't like a well-executed spy film?
The Girl Who Kicked the Hornet's Nest: Through a series of unfortunate circumstances and weather complications, I didn't get to see the third movie in the Millennium Trilogy when I thought I was going to. Critics would probably say that that's okay, but when I start a trilogy and enjoy its first two parts, I like to finish it.
Youth in Revolt: Was seriously pretty good. I liked it a lot.

Edge of Darkness: Wasn’t as bad as I thought it might be, but after I started to like it a bit, I sadly realized that it could have been a whole lot better. Not bad, but not excellent by any stretch.

Hot Tub Time Machine: Wasn’t as funny as I thought it would be, but not a total waste of time. Set expectations to “way low” and you’ll be fine.

Clash of the Titans: THE CRITICS WERE RIGHT, BRAD. This is the worst fucking movie I have paid to see in theaters in a seriously long time. Total dog shit. Avoid at all costs. Please. Seriously. Don’t fucking do it, I beg you. (BTW, I really like the mythos of this story, and it should have been good, but it was a complete failure from begining to end.)

Despicable Me: This was pretty damn good. Funny, and has a cute side, too. Worth your attention.

Tangled: Awesome movie. One of the best of the year. I would actually suggest you try to see it in a theater, and in 3D. It lives up to the hype and then some.

The Human Centipede: Intriguing to me for the same reasons as you. I have a digital copy (downloaded) on my PC that I’ll watch someday when I’m bored as hell.

Salt: Agree with your comments on this one. It’s at the top of my Blockbuster queue.

The Girl Who Kicked the Hornet's Nest: Have a copy / waiting to watch / can’t wait. I haven’t seen “The Girl Who Played with Fire” yet, either, though. Do you think that’ll be a problem? I know these movies are part of a trilogy, but from what I hear they are un-related plots that simply involve one central character, so I’m thinking it probably won’t matter if I see them out of order.

DethMaiden
12-22-2010, 03:02 PM
YIR: Cool, I'll put it in my queue. :fist:
EOD: Damn, too bad. Kinda thought that's how it would be though.
HTTM: Duly noted.
COTT: :lol: Fair enough. I'll keep that one in the skip category.
DM: Noted.
Tangled: I'll talk to my little sister about a re-watching. :D
THC (herr derr): It's instant from Netflix, so it's just a matter of time. Waiting for a boring day too.
Salt: :fist:
TGWKTHN: I saw The Girl Who Played With Fire before I saw The Girl With the Dragon Tattoo and wasn't bothered a bit, so I'd say you're fine.

DethMaiden
12-22-2010, 03:04 PM
Also, I doubt if I get to docs tonight. Christmas shopping/wrapping/returning-things-I-found-out-other-family-members-already-bought is gonna take most of my waking hours.

Sepultura69
12-22-2010, 03:50 PM
Blue Valentine: The NC-17 rating may have dissuaded some people, but it actually served to insert a move that otherwise wouldn't have been on my radar into my consciousness. The trailer is beautiful, and while I'm not compelled to see it immediately and don't think it could breach my top ten, it does look good.


I just finished watching the trailer for it. I'm extremely interested in seeing this film now. Looks very promising and all the reviews/Critics seem to think very highly of it. Also the Movie is no longer NC-17, the director won an appeal and got the movie overturned to an R rating.

http://www.latimes.com/entertainment/la-et-blue-valentine-rated-r-story,0,6788651.story

I will definitely catch this film when it comes out next week.

makethemsuffer12
12-22-2010, 03:50 PM
the worst movie i watched this year was 'the book of eli' i fucking despise that movie

Really? I enjoyed it.

I've seen a few of the not-so-praised movies, so here's my take on them:

The Wolfman was good, but not really great. The acting was good and all, but there wasn't enough action if I remember correctly, though when there was it was nice and bloody.

Salt was pretty enjoyable. Not one of the best movies of the year by any means, but there was nothing particularly bad about it.

Now, this opinion is probably a rare one, but I honestly didn't think Clash of the Titans was a real bad movie. I feel that it had the potential to be a lot better, mainly because I felt that there was almost too much shoved into one movie. It would've without a doubt worked better as a two-part movie.

As for some other movies,

Hot Tub Time Machine is definately worth a watch. It was without a doubt hilarious, though there weren't any particularly memorable one-liners.

I'm kind of mixed about Youth in Revolt. I did enjoy it, but I didn't think it was really great. There was nothing where I really laughed out loud at. Nowhere near as good as Scott Pilgrim, which I was loling at quite a bit.

Indestructible
12-22-2010, 03:51 PM
You've lost your movie talking privileges, so please stay out of my thread. Not because I disagree with you, but because you're fucking willfully ignorant. I'm not even the biggest horror fan in the world anymore, but anyone with a pulse knows that all horror movies aren't like that. Hell, I've only seen one (Friday the 13th) that's even remotely like that, and I've seen a lot of horror movies.

All the horror movies i have seen are like that. I don't even like SAW and The Texas Chainsaw as much as I use to.

rjmartinez91
12-22-2010, 03:54 PM
Oh my :bouville:

El Gordo
12-22-2010, 04:01 PM
All the horror movies i have seen are like that. I don't even like SAW and The Texas Chainsaw as much as I use to.

Then you're watching the wrong fucking movies. Do you realize that you sound like someone who's heard two death metal bands and says they all sound the same?... Oh wait...

ravenheart
12-22-2010, 04:04 PM
I see nothing special about horror films. Five teens go camping and get slaughtered by some insane guy with an axe. That is how I some up all horror movies I see because that is all that goes on in the horror movies I have seen.

:lol: :lol: :lol: :lol:

Wait, you're serious?

Do you only watch popcorn horror or something? The Wrong Turn trilogy (I know, they made three, what the fuck?!) doesn't define horror movies. And to lump suspense movies in with that too? That's not lack of exposure, that's just plain stupid.

Indestructible
12-22-2010, 04:10 PM
:lol: :lol: :lol: :lol:

Wait, you're serious?

Do you only watch popcorn horror or something? The Wrong Turn trilogy (I know, they made three, what the fuck?!) doesn't define horror movies. And to lump suspense movies in with that too? That's not lack of exposure, that's just plain stupid.

Ive seen a few texas chainsaw films. I saw the first 5 saws, Nightmare on elm street 3(bits and pieces of others), Freddy VS Jason and bits and pieces of Friday the 13th, the human centipede and many others.

ravenheart
12-22-2010, 04:14 PM
Do you only watch popcorn horror or something?

Ive seen a few texas chainsaw films. I saw the first 5 saws, Nightmare on elm street 3(bits and pieces of others), Freddy VS Jason and bits and pieces of Friday the 13th, the human centipede and many others.

You could have just said "yes". It would have taken you less time to type.

Sepultura69
12-22-2010, 04:22 PM
Ive seen a few texas chainsaw films. I saw the first 5 saws, Nightmare on elm street 3(bits and pieces of others), Freddy VS Jason and bits and pieces of Friday the 13th. I have seen other horror films too.

Ever heard of:

George A Romeros "Dawn of the Dead"???

Peter Jacksons "Dead Alive" also known as "Braindead"???
*OK ITS NOT SO MUCH A STRAIGHT UP HORROR MOVIE....But it still kicks ass!!!*

John Carpenters "The Thing"????

Sam raimi's EVIL DEAD.....and EVIL DEAD 2??!?!

Check them out....you might learn a thing or two on what real horror movies are..

street_burial
12-22-2010, 04:24 PM
Youth in Revolt: Michael Cera playing kinda-not-Michael Cera. Funny, maybe?
Cop Out: Kevin Smith, Tracy Morgan, Bruce Willis...what could go wrong?
Alice in Wonderland: I basically hate Tim Burton, but I'm still weirdly attracted to his films.
Hot Tub Time Machine: The title should have been enough to get me out to this one.
Clash of the Titans: Got bullied by critics into skipping what looked like a pretty fun fantasy flick.

Youth In Revolt: One of Michael Cera's best movies

Cop Out: Had a few one-liners, easy to follow, pretty funny

Alice In Wonderland: sucked

Hot Tub Time Machine: One of the best movies i watched all year. All around hilarious.

Clash Of The Titans: It was absolutely terrible, i wouldnt wish that upon my worst enemy

ravenheart
12-22-2010, 04:29 PM
Youth In Revolt: One of Michael Cera's best movies

Not difficult to achieve.

DethMaiden
12-22-2010, 04:29 PM
Hey, say what you will about Michael Cera, but Superbad, Juno, Scott Pilgrim, and Arrested Development are all fantastic.

street_burial
12-22-2010, 04:42 PM
Hey, say what you will about Michael Cera, but Superbad, Juno, Scott Pilgrim, and Arrested Development are all fantastic.

"Nick and Norah's Infinite Playlist" wasn't terrible either, it was one of those movies that you got to watch more than once to really appreciate though

ravenheart
12-23-2010, 03:45 AM
Hey, say what you will about Michael Cera, but Superbad, Juno, Scott Pilgrim, and Arrested Development are all fantastic.

I'll give you that one. But it wasn't fantastic because of him.

mastodon421
12-23-2010, 05:11 AM
When it comes to the movies you listed earlier that you haven't I have seen quite a few here thoughts on them

Youth In Revolt: Decent Movie, saved by it's supporting cast. Zach Galinfinakis and Fred Willard steal the show.

Edge Of Darkness: It's alright. Not a complete a waste of time, but not really worth watching.

From Paris With Love: I'm a complete action movie whore, I thought it was pretty good, but there were far better action films to come out this year.

The Wolfman:Worst movie i've seen this year. It's an absolute shitfest. A movie about a werewolf tearing people in half shouldn't be this boring.

Cop Out: I found it to be pretty amusing, Tracy Morgan always cracks me up.

Hot Tub Time Machine: Funniest movie of the year, imo. I have seen it a few times and it holds up very well.

Clash Of The Titans: I found it to be a very entertaining remake. I enjoyed it a good amount.

Jonah Hex: Not as bad as it was made out to be, but it's still not good at all. Josh Brolin does a good lob, everybody else, especially John Malkovich is awful.

The Last Airbender:Just as bad as advertised. Good choice skipping it, it sucks hard.

The Fighter: It's really far from cliche actually. It's more a film about family then it is boxing. Excellent movie that is a lock from my top 5.

The Town: I loved it. It's not really Departed-esque, it's more Heat- esque than anything else. Another one of my faves for the year.

127 Hours: I had zero intrest in seeing it either, I ended up liking it quite a bit. James Franco was outstanding, I hope he gets Best Actor. The arm cutting off scene last about a minute, they don't draw it out too much.

Date Night: It's pretty funny. It takes a little bit to get going, but once it picks up, the laughs keep coming.

Natrlhi
12-23-2010, 06:10 AM
You could have just said "yes". It would have taken you less time to type.
:lol: Extra salty. Very nice.


EDIT: Just for that, I give you this...

http://www.bscreview.com/wp-content/uploads/2010/04/angelina-jolie-salt.jpg

Natrlhi
12-23-2010, 06:13 AM
I see nothing special about horror films. Five teens go camping and get slaughtered by some insane guy with an axe. That is how I some up all horror movies I see because that is all that goes on in the horror movies I have seen.
Yeah, I couldn't stand how all those teens were slaughtered by that insane guy with an axe in the movie "Alien". I mean, how derivative and boring can you get? :zzz:



Oh, and you might want to look up the difference between "some" and "sum".

Natrlhi
12-23-2010, 06:15 AM
I see nothing special about horror films. Five teens go camping and get slaughtered by some insane guy with an axe. That is how I some up all horror movies I see because that is all that goes on in the horror movies I have seen.
Yeah, I mean, what was the deal with all those teens getting slaughtered by that insane guy with an axe in the movie "The Exorcist"? I mean, that shit is just plain stupid. :rolleyes:

Natrlhi
12-23-2010, 06:19 AM
I see nothing special about horror films. Five teens go camping and get slaughtered by some insane guy with an axe. That is how I some up all horror movies I see because that is all that goes on in the horror movies I have seen.
Ya know what was really fucking stupid? All those teens getting slaughtered by that insane guy with an axe in the movie "Jaws". That was just rigoddamndiculous. :nonono:



Oh, and you might want to look up the difference between "some" and "sum".

ravenheart
12-23-2010, 07:46 AM
Early on-set Altzheimer's, Nat? ;)

DethMaiden
12-23-2010, 08:10 AM
The Fighter: It's really far from cliche actually. It's more a film about family then it is boxing. Excellent movie that is a lock from my top 5.

The Town: I loved it. It's not really Departed-esque, it's more Heat- esque than anything else. Another one of my faves for the year.


You are from Boston = not taking this seriously

;)

ravenheart
12-23-2010, 08:16 AM
I agree that From Paris Was Love was surprisingly entertaining. I didn't hate The Wolfman either, but it could have been far better. I very much enjoyed The Book of Eli. But Inception beat everything so hard, nothing else I actually saw matters.

DethMaiden
12-23-2010, 08:17 AM
I agree that From Paris Was Love was surprisingly entertaining. I didn't hate The Wolfman either, but it could have been far better. I very much enjoyed The Book of Eli. But Inception beat everything so hard, nothing else I actually saw matters.

No spoilers! :mad:



Just kidding, Inception won't be #1. But it will be very, very high. :D

EDIT: Right now I only have a top 9, I'm waiting until I see The King's Speech the day after Christmas to fill in that last spot.

Natrlhi
12-23-2010, 08:45 AM
Early on-set Altzheimer's, Nat? ;)

I don't know - can other peoples' willful ignorance accelerate the onset of Alzheimer's? If so, then probably yes. ;)

Indestructible
12-23-2010, 09:00 AM
I don't know - can other peoples' willful ignorance accelerate the onset of Alzheimer's? If so, then probably yes. ;)

Yeah that's the last thing I am, I just hate most horror movies.

Derelict
12-23-2010, 09:06 AM
Man, i derive such entertainment from watching raven and nat mess with bibble.

Good thread, btw.

Natrlhi
12-23-2010, 09:16 AM
Man, i derive such entertainment from watching raven and nat mess with bibble.Who, me? I agreed with "bibble", as you call him (:fist:, btw) three times in a row, and ask a legitimate health-related question, and this is how you interpret my comments?

I am so misunderstood sometimes... :angel:

;)

Derelict
12-23-2010, 09:26 AM
You could have just said "yes". It would have taken you less time to type.

this one wins the thread, IMO

lol @ nat

Sepultura69
12-23-2010, 09:33 AM
Since we are on the discussions about boring lame genres of films.....Martin Scorsese is pretty lame. All His Drama films are the same.....its just some 5 kids in the middle of a desert getting slaughtered one by one by Raptor-jesus who is a clone of Jesus Christ Spliced with Raptor DNA.....i donno guys i just hate like all drama fliks that how i sumz it up

Natrlhi
12-23-2010, 09:57 AM
Notice how it's not funny when you do it?

Sepultura69
12-23-2010, 10:02 AM
Notice how it's not funny when you do it?

:/

Dextrimental
12-23-2010, 10:06 AM
Yeah that's the last thing I am, I just hate most horror movies.

You haven't seen most horror movies. In order for you to dislike most of something, you must have actually tried most of something. If you hate the few horror movies you've seen, fair enough, but don't judge the many by the few, thats pig ignorant.

DethMaiden
12-23-2010, 10:13 AM
Notice how it's not funny when you do it?

:lol: :lol: :lol:

Natrlhi
12-23-2010, 10:25 AM
You haven't seen most horror movies. In order for you to dislike most of something, you must have actually tried most of something. If you hate the few horror movies you've seen, fair enough, but don't judge the many by the few, thats pig ignorant.A lucid and well-thought-out argument, and well-expressed, but one which I'm afraid will ultimately be wasted due to lack of comprehension or utter obstinacy.

Nice one, tho, mate! :D

:lol: :lol: :lol:
:cool:

Dextrimental
12-23-2010, 10:27 AM
A lucid and well-thought-out argument, and well-expressed, but one which I'm afraid will ultimately be wasted due to lack of comprehension or utter obstinacy.

Nice one, tho, mate! :D


:cool:

Haha I know, I just wanted to have my say against him, wit isn't my strong point, so I though a well structured argument would do me more justice! :)

DethMaiden
12-23-2010, 10:55 PM
Documentaries: I didn't want these to be eligible for my actual top ten, partly so I wouldn't have to think about how to integrate them, but also because they're a fairly different category from "movies" even while residing in the medium.

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5. Freakonomics
I'm a certified economics nerd, and I love Steven Levitt and Stephen Dubner's Freakonomics and its sequel, Superfreakonomics, but the film adaptation of their first book does not need to exist – at least not theatrically. It's a competent retelling of the duo's findings divided into five chapters with different directors (Super-Size Me director Morgan Spurlock's being the best), but only one of those segments deviates from the book, and all of them look like something you might linger on if they came on cable but wouldn't willfully pay to see.

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4. Rush: Beyond the Lighted Stage
Since this actually did hit theaters, I don't feel too weird about putting it here. It's a pretty standard band doc, but it was directed by Sam Dunn of Flight 666 and Metal: A Headbanger's Journey fame, so it's naturally very well-made. I learned a lot about one of my favorite bands, and while I would have liked a little more music in it, it was still a very interesting movie.

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3. Once Brothers
This perhaps belongs a bit less than the Rush movie since it only ever aired on television and is part of a series of documentaries, but it was the only 30 for 30 film I was able to watch in 2010, so I'll count it. While Once Brothers bums me out because I half-intended to write the story it tells in book form, it's still a brilliant exploration of the fallout between former Yugoslav basketball teammates (principally Vlade Divac and Drazen Petrovic) divided by that country's civil war. The filmmaking techniques are a little bland – it's directed by "NBA Entertainment" rather than a human being – but the story it tells is consistently riveting.

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2. Restrepo
It's inevitable that I'll get around to it since every review I've read says it, so I'll get it out of the way now: Restrepo is the documentary version of The Hurt Locker. While the former takes place in Afghanistan and the latter in Iraq, the two films are structured fairly similarly. Restrepo documents one year in the life of a platoon stationed in Afghanistan's Korangal Valley, the place CNN dubbed "the most dangerous place on Earth." It's the best insight on the War on Terror I've ever seen, and it very briefly made me want to enlist – that's how powerful its depiction of our troops in the Middle East is. It's an unflinchingly honest film, and in most years, it would be my favorite documentary.

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1. Exit Through the Gift Shop
The only 2010 doc I saw that was able to top the greatness of Restrepo was Exit Through the Gift Shop, a seemingly straightforward documentary about street art that has stirred up more controversy than perhaps any other movie this year. Directed by infamous British street artist Banksy, the film follows French filmmaker/possible sociopath Thierry Guetta as he goes from documentarian of the street art movement to bona fide street artist. Whether Mr. Brainwash, Guetta's artist alter ego, is actually real or not, is the film's principle question, and while Banksy insists that he is, it's as though he's winking under that trademark hoodie of his, leaving it intentionally open to the viewer's interpretation. Whether some of Exit Through the Gift Shop is fabricated or not, it's the most riveting documentary of the year, and well worth anyone's ninety minutes.

DethMaiden
12-24-2010, 07:21 AM
I'll be doing daily updates on my blog from here on out:

http://brad250.blogspot.com/


Tonight, non top ten movies.
Christmas I'm taking off.
26th, the top ten.
27th, the Brads (like the Oscars? herr derr)

EDIT: I'm still posting here, duh. Just also on the blog now.

DethMaiden
12-24-2010, 04:44 PM
And now, with the films I didn't see and documentary features out of the way, it's time to start counting down the 2010 movies I've seen, starting with the godawful and eventually reaching the sublime. Here we go!

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25. Vampires Suck
This isn't just the worst movie of 2010; it's the worst movie I've ever seen. It was friends' wishes, not morbid curiosity, that led me to see this rubbish at a drive-in over the summer, and its mercifully short running time was the least fun I've ever had at the movies, let alone at a so-called comedy. Already dated pop culture references, scatological jokes, physical humor, and everything else that one should expect from a Scary Movie offshoot was present, and in spades. Avoid at all costs.

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24. Iron Man 2
I actually had somewhat high hopes for this movie. I thought its prequel was one of the best things Marvel has ever done for the big screen, and even though the trailer had a few warning signs that the second one wouldn't be as good, I went in with optimism. That optimism was shattered. The script is atrocious, making everything that comes out of Robert Downey, Jr.'s mouth a hackneyed catchphrase. The brilliant "Demon in a Bottle" storyline from the comic is reduced to a series of sight gags and bland witticisms, the film introduces way too many new characters and characterizes none of them, and serves essentially as a two-hour ad for the forthcoming Avengers movie. Wake me up when that comes out, because Iron Man 2 sucked.

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23. Dinner for Schmucks
2010 was a wretched year for comedies. No movie is more telling of that fact than Dinner for Schmucks, a remake of the 1990s French film The Dinner Game that stars Paul Rudd, Steve Carell, and Zach Galifianakis, but still manages to suck. It has a couple of funny parts, but coming off of the output those three dudes have had in the last decade, it should have been the funniest movie in years. It wasn't, and the (mercifully) brief Jeff Dunham appearance pushed it as low on the list as it is for me. Anything that gives that, erm, schmuck more money is going to catch some heat from me.

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22. Diary of a Wimpy Kid
My middle school brother dragged me to this story of a middle school kid facing typical middle school problems. Bullying, gross lunches, finding a group to fit in with, and every other trope of the genre is present, and while it was executed fairly well, it really didn't need to be a movie in the first place. Nickelodeon shows like Ned's Declassified and As Told By Ginger have done more than enough exploration of what it's like to go to middle school. This doesn't suck, but it's not worth paying for when turning on the TV will more often than not turn up the exact same thing.

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21. Red
My expectations for this movie were higher than they should have been. A great cast does not a great movie make, and Morgan Freeman, John Malkovich, Helen Mirren, Mary-Louise Parker and Bruce Willis seem to barely be trying here. I haven't read the comic that Red is based on, but it didn't inspire me to do so. While it's good for a few laughs – mostly based on the fact that old people are using automatic weapons – it's ultimately a popcorn flick that you'll forget about halfway back to your car in the parking lot.

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20. Micmacs
I have to give Amélie director Jean-Pierre Jeunet a lot of credit for this movie even though I didn't particularly like it. It is, if nothing else, extremely ambitious. More characters, places, visual elements and ideas are introduced than in anything else I saw this year. Unfortunately, Jeunet doesn't flesh them out as much as he needs to, and his characters basically exist as humorous caricatures rather than actual, sympathetic people. I'd probably have this movie higher if it didn't borrow its entire visual identity from some of the worse Terry Gilliam films. A busy frame is not always an effective frame, and while Jeunet managed to organize his chaos in his 2001 masterpiece, that is not the case in Micmacs.

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19. How to Train Your Dragon
Here comes controversy. It should be noted that I actually did enjoy most of the movies I saw this year, and that this low ranking doesn't mean I am soulless and didn't find anything to enjoy in the movie. But all that said, yes, I do think How to Train Your Dragon was probably the most overrated movie of 2010. I think people were blinded by the fact that Dreamworks managed to make a movie that wasn't all pop culture references and jokes for the adults that would fly over kids' heads (Shrek is still their only great movie). Yes, this is a visually stunning movie with a sympathetic, interesting lead, but the voice cast sucks and it's a bit of a one-trick pony. I can't even count the number of scenes in which we see Hiccup a) training Toothless or b) taming other dragons. They are many. I'll at least give the movie mad props for not pulling any punches with the ending. Much more bittersweet than one would expect from a kids' film not made by Pixar.

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18. The Other Guys
While 19th place was underachievement for How to Train Your Dragon, 18th for The Other Guys is massive overachievement. I don't even like Will Ferrell all that much, but he and Mark Wahlberg had great comedic chemistry and gave us the best buddy cop flick in decades. A few of the gags get driven into the ground, but the punchlines just keep coming and the story is interesting enough to keep you watching. It's tough to analyze a Will Ferrell movie, so I'll just say that if you like Anchorman and Talladega Nights, you'll probably like The Other Guys. Ferrell is the man of a thousand movies but just one character. At least that character is funny.

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17. Legend of the Guardians: The Owls of Ga'Hoole
I love owls. I wouldn't have gone to this movie if I didn't. Aside from its heroes being owls, there's very little to differentiate this film from a million other animated fantasy flicks. Still, its execution is so perfect that it's hard to complain. Zack Snyder's directorial debut in animation may go down as his best movie, though, as he's forced to show a restraint that has been sorely lacking from all of his live-action pictures. Legend of the Guardians could have made a run at my top ten this year if it weren't for the fact that some dumbass decided that an Owl City song should be played during the climactic battle scene, thus basically ruining the moment and, in turn, a lot of the movie. 17th might be a little high for a movie that pissed me off more than any other this year, but the parts that didn't piss me off were all done so well that I can't fight it.

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16. The Girl Who Played With Fire
I actually saw this, the second film in the Swedish Millennium Trilogy, before I saw its predecessor, The Girl With the Dragon Tattoo. Without knowing how great that movie was, I enjoyed the hell out of this one. Noomi Rapace gives yet another stellar performance as renegade computer hacker Lisbeth Salander, and we get details of her back story that prove as emotionally resonant as anything in the darker, more moving first picture. Michael Nyqvist is a bit more on the sidelines here as investigative journalist Mikael Blomkvist, and his plotline isn't nearly as interesting as Lisbeth's, but as my introduction to the characters of the trilogy, The Girl Who Played With Fire was an engrossing, beautiful film.

DethMaiden
12-24-2010, 04:44 PM
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15. The Secret in Their Eyes
The most recent Academy Award winner for Best Foreign Language Film finally touched down in U.S. theaters earlier this year, and it landed with a bang. This Argentine crime investigation film by noted director Juan Jose Campanella struggles with some pacing issues, but more than resolves them with some gritty, graphic scenes and a twist ending for the ages. Even if it occasionally feels like an extra-long episode of Law & Order: Special Victims Unit – a series Campanella has directed several episodes of – The Secret in Their Eyes is a fine introduction to Argentine film and more than deserving of its Oscar.

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14. The Social Network
I'm sure someone will want to crucify me for this one. 14th isn't bad, but it's a far cry from the Movie of the Year honors that have been bestowed upon it all over the Web and in newspapers across the globe. While I really liked The Social Network, I found its deliberate pace and so-called Rashomon-style narrative to be a solid step below their hype. There are great performances across the board, and I do recognize that in this social media-driven world, a movie about the interconnectedness of society with Facebook founder Mark Zuckerberg as its principle character is about as timely as any movie could be. But I still found it less entertaining than thirteen other movies. Let the Hollywood kingmakers laud its importance; I'm here to have a good time.

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13. Rare Exports
Some movies this year weren't historically important at all. In what will surely never go down as a holiday classic, the Norwegian film Rare Exports (sometimes subtitled with "A Christmas Tale") challenges the modern conception of Santa Claus and instead paints him as the child-killing maniac that the old mythologies apparently intended him to be. It has its frightening moments, but it's mostly delivered in a tongue-in-cheek manner, and while we never actually get to see Santa (that's actually an elf in the trailer), it's a raucous good time that finally explains its confusing title in the final five minutes in what, in a perfect world, would become one of the most revered sequences in the Christmas movie canon.

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12. Machete
"Machete don't text." Maybe Robert Rodriguez was trying too hard to own 2010's most iconic line, but he may have succeeded by default in a year mostly devoid of punchy scripts. In any case, his Mexploitation B-movie tribute is just as fun and bloody as similar films like Kill Bill and The Devil's Rejects and may have been the most fun I had in the theaters this year. Danny Trejo is BAMF through and through, and while Rodriguez mostly fails in his attempts to juggle friendly, violent fun with serious political discourse, he still manages to turn in an incredibly enjoyable effort that is more grindhouse than Grindhouse was.

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11. Scott Pilgrim vs. the World
And standing just outside my top ten is Edgar Wright's adaptation of Bryan Lee O'Malley's graphic novel series, Scott Pilgrim. I didn't know where the hell this was going to end up when I watched it, because I didn't know how to compare a movie unlike any I'd ever seen before to other movies. No film has ever before tried so hard to look like it belonged in another medium – a strange mix of video games and comic books, in this case – and succeeded so brilliantly. When Scott defeats an enemy, they explode into a shower of coins. Sound effects appear as words on the screen. Nonsequitur visual gags appear at such an alarming clip that if you blinked you'd miss them, and yet the whole movie remains a cohesive package with a clear, pronounced vision. Scott Pilgrim vs. the World may stumble around in the dark a few times, but in such uncharted territory, even the effort is worth serious commendation.

jhdeity
12-24-2010, 05:47 PM
After watching Scott Pilgrim I thought 99% of the people watching this either really loved it or totally hated it. I'm part of the 1% because I thought if I were 12 I would have loved it.

powerslave_85
12-24-2010, 08:37 PM
A few random thoughts:

Restrepo- Amazing. Should be required viewing.

Hot Tub Time Machine- Extremely disappointing, given how funny the cast is individually. Maybe I'm just burned out on R-rated comedies that are mostly gross-out sex gags.

Iron Man 2- I won't argue that it was a let-down, but I liked it more than you seem to.

How To Train Your Dragon- I loved it. Yeah, the voice cast is probably the weak point, but you don't need to have A-list people every time for it to work.

DethMaiden
12-24-2010, 08:39 PM
How To Train Your Dragon- I loved it. Yeah, the voice cast is probably the weak point, but you don't need to have A-list people every time for it to work.

It wasn't that they weren't A-listers, it's that they all have stupidly recognizable voices. Jay Baruchel, Jonah Hill and Christopher Mintz-Plasse should not be allowed to voice characters in the same movie.

powerslave_85
12-24-2010, 08:52 PM
"Stupidly recognizable" isn't always a bad thing either, though. People like Tom Hanks and Billy Crystal have very recognizable voices, but they manage to transcend that familiarity. I think with Jonah Hill and Mintz-Plasse (not to mention Seth Rogen) it's a matter of over-saturation. They just seem to be in everything lately.

The more I think about it, Sam Rockwell pretty much single-handedly saved Iron Man 2 from being completely forgettable.

mastodon421
12-25-2010, 06:16 AM
I got to disagree on Dinner For Schmucks and Iron Man 2. Iron Man 2 let me down as well, but I still liked a good amount. I thought Dinner For Schmucks was really funny, actually. I really liked the cast and Jermaine Clement killed me. I do completely agree about Machete, though.

edit: I haven't seen The Social Network yet, but I have feeling like it is really overhyped.

DethMaiden
12-26-2010, 03:25 PM
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10. Shutter Island
I'm always willing to commend an established artist for venturing into unfamiliar territory when the familiar has done nothing but serve them well. Martin Scorsese reaches far beyond his usual fare with this mystery horror homage to Hitchcockian noir. Leo DiCaprio lays his Departed accent on thick as Federal Marshal Teddy Daniels, ostensibly sent to a remote insane asylum to investigate the disappearance of a patient. As his investigation continues, he only seems to get further from the truth until the thrilling climax and heart-wrenching denouement. While the film took some flak for its Scooby Doo-styled reveals and half-baked David Lynch dream sequences, it's so much fun to follow its constant twists and turns that it's hard to hate it – besides, even the weak points can be chalked up to homage, as Hitchcock wasn't always the most well-rounded filmmaker himself.

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9. Winter's Bone
In Debra Granik's adaptation of Daniel Woodrell's novel of the same name, the tone is so oppressive that it's difficult to imagine anyone smiling at any point in its duration. Jennifer Lawrence shines as Ree Dolly, a hard-nosed adolescent forced to raise her family deep in the Ozarks while her mother is ill and her meth-cooking father is God-knows-where, on the lam from a bail bondsman and sheriff who promise to repossess the Dollys' house if he isn't found – dead or alive. Ree embarks on a seemingly Sisyphean hero's journey that reminded this middle-class college student that there's a world beyond higher education and its trappings. No one in the movie is seen with a cell phone or on a computer even though it's set in 2010, and showers and orthodontic care appear few and far between. It's a sobering film, and its tragic centerpiece is the scene where Ree finally finds her father. It ends on a somewhat happy note, with Ree coming into some money she very badly needs to take care of her family, but it's clear that even the Good Life in her world is a thousand times harder than the way most of us are privileged enough to live.

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8. Kick-Ass
As I've descended into the depths of film snobbery over the past year, my capacity to enjoy good old-fashioned dumb fun has somewhat declined. My film critic tendencies couldn't stop me from loving this one, though; it was just too fucking fun. Unlike Roger Ebert, who couldn't quite get past the fact that an eleven-year-old girl (Hit-Girl, played by Chloë Moretz) would call a group of bad guys "cunts" and that the level of violence is beyond gratuitous, I couldn't stop laughing and silently applauding as Hit-Girl sliced through legions of enemies and dropped her distinctly R-rated catchphrases. The second time I watched the movie, some of that novelty wore off and the thinness of the plot (Regular guy decides to become superhero and gets caught up in fairly standard Mob plot) revealed itself, which is why it isn't higher. It was still the most fun that I had at the theaters this year, and the best comic book film of 2010.

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7. The Kids Are All Right
Leave it to a lesbian filmmaker to make the most richly detailed, authentic portrait of the life of a normal family in America in 2010 that I saw this year. And conservatives think they're too out of touch to raise kids...but anyway. The Kids Are All Right is a lighthearted, beautiful movie about two lesbian moms of two artificially inseminated kids who get curious about the identity of their sperm donor father, look him up, and forge a friendship with him. One of the moms (Julianne Moore) starts sleeping with him (Mark Ruffalo) while the other (Annette Bening) becomes increasingly stressed at work and starts to take it out on her family. The relationships between the characters – all of whom are brilliantly acted and should land the film plenty of Oscar nominations – are realer than just about any other film relationships I've seen, and the movie is entirely character-driven, with only a few relevant plot points, almost all of which are detailed above. It's a heartwarming movie, even at its most emotionally tense, and it has my vote for 2010's best ensemble cast.

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6. The Girl With the Dragon Tattoo
There's hardly a year since cinema's origins that didn't produce an absolutely masterful Swedish film, and this year was no exception. Niels Arden Oplev's adaptation of the first book in Stieg Larsson's Millennium Trilogy is a psychologically taut crime thriller. Veteran character actor Michael Nyqvist plays Mikael Blomkvist, a journalist locked in a court battle over a libel accusation and in the midst of an investigation on a forty-year-old cold case, and relative newcomer Noomi Rapace gives one of the strongest female performances of the year as punk-rock computer hacker Lisbeth Salander, whose own research talents are at first used to investigate Blomkvist until they eventually join forces. Their individual trials and tribulations are fascinating enough, but it's where their paths intersect and their chemistry is allowed to shine that the film is at its best. There's shades of Ingmar Bergman, as with most Swedish national cinema, but Oplev succeeds in making this adaptation his own.

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5. Toy Story 3
No third movie in a series of animated pictures should, in theory, ever be the fifth best film of a given year. But theory doesn't account for the existence of Pixar, a veritable powerhouse of greatness at this point that has a remarkable masterpiece-to-crap ratio unmatched by any other studio, animated or otherwise. Toy Story 3 is very possibly their most complete film yet, flawlessly marrying the emotional depth of movies like Up and WALL-E with the rip-roaring adventure and comedy of lighter fare like Monsters, Inc. or its own prequels. An entire generation (mine) empathizes with Andy as he goes off to a future uncertain and, both literally and symbolically, leaves behind childish things. The incredibly moving scene at the landfill is likely 2010's best.

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4. The King's Speech
This one has so much Oscar buzz and so many big names that it feels weird to call it underrated, but I'm about to: The King's Speech is underrated as hell. It's struggled to find an audience outside of the biggest U.S. markets, it's found itself conspicuously absent from plenty of critics' lists, and I have yet to hear a single person call it the best film of the year. Colin Firth, Helena Bonham Carter, and Geoffrey Rush arguably each give the best performance of their respective careers in this historical drama centered on King George VI's (Firth) lifelong stutter and his relationship with speech therapist Lionel Logue (Rush). It's not as stuffy as it sounds; Rush's character brings plenty of whimsy and irreverence to the mix, dragging His Majesty into his little world and coaxing some of the funniest scenes and lines of the year from their meetings. While director Tom Hooper's execution is mostly ordinary, the film's climax turns a time-worn cliché on its head: Firth is called upon to give a speech on the day Britain declares war on Germany and invites Rush to guide him through it, and while the speech is undoubtedly rousing, the focus is not at all on the content; it's on the elocution. We've seen speeches as climaxes in films before, but never quite like this.

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3. True Grit
It's often considered blasphemy to opine that a remake is better than an original, and that is especially the case in genre filmmaking, where fans cling to the old classics like a religion. Indeed, 1969's True Grit – the film that earned John Wayne his only Oscar – is a difficult movie to best, but the Coen Brothers are just the people to do it, and with this Jeff Bridges-starring throwback Western, they have absolutely done it. Their True Grit is the best film in the genre since 1992's Unforgiven, and it does what every great Western should do: It lets the camera do the talking. Yes, there are brilliant, verbose performances from Bridges, newcomer Hailee Steinfeld, Matt Damon, Josh Brolin, and others, but the Coens pull the camera back and let us drink in the rolling landscapes of the Old West and then zoom it back in to show us the craggy expressions of work-hardened men and women. This isn't mere Sergio Leone worship, though; the Brothers have their indelible stamp all over it, and it's bound to join the canon of their finest works.

http://l23.sphotos.l3.fbcdn.net/hphotos-l3-snc4/hs1359.snc4/163150_1808065121832_1246070433_32135773_3212891_n .jpg

2. Inception
No movie was more anticipated in 2010 than the latest mind-bending thriller by Christopher Nolan. He has forged one of the most recognizable directorial identities of the last fifty years with his brand of exposition-heavy, brainy action films, and Inception feels, in a lot of ways, like the full realization of his talents. It's an at times literally labyrinthine exploration of a completely fabricated dream world. Some criticisms have said that it's not a realistic reflection of dreams, but it's not supposed to be. Leave the David Lynches and Takashi Miikes of the world to paint nightmarish dreamscapes on film; Christopher Nolan wants to show us what dreams would be like if we had drugs and technology that could make them occur in a predictable manner, and he does so with great success. Nolan tells us everything we need to know. A focused viewing will make every scene totally clear, and when we're left to decide the ending for ourselves, we shouldn't feel cheated. Quite the contrary, we should feel honored. It's Nolan trusting us more than he's ever trusted an audience before. Ultimately, it doesn't even matter what the ending is; it's the journey that's important.

http://sphotos.ak.fbcdn.net/hphotos-ak-snc6/hs025.snc6/165580_1808063801799_1246070433_32135765_3231655_n .jpg

1. Black Swan
And at long last, behold: the best film of 2010. Darren Aronofsky spent a decade revising and rewriting a script that was originally about a New York theater troupe to make it the best movie about the stage ever made. Set in the ultra-competitive world of professional ballet, company dancer Nina (Natalie Portman, in a role that finally shows her full potential as one of the greatest actresses of our time) is given the chance to be the prima ballerina in a production of Swan Lake. The pressure of the role, along with the unorthodox methods of her director (Vincent Cassel) and competition from a new company member (Mila Kunis) sends her spiraling into a mental breakdown that makes the audience question what is real and what isn't. Unlike Christopher Nolan, though, Aronofsky doesn't let us off the hook and tell us what to believe. Nothing is certain, and even multiple viewings can produce only theories, not conclusive truths. It's a brilliantly acted, brilliantly directed fusion of Mulholland Dr. and The Wrestler that brings with it countless layers of meaning and limitless potential for analysis, and it is without a doubt the finest movie of the year.

mastodon421
12-26-2010, 04:01 PM
Nice top 10, 4 of those(Inception,Kick-Ass,Toy Story 3, Black Swan) are in mine as well and Shutter Island is in my top 20. I'm dying to see True Grit, i've heard nothing but great things about it.

street_burial
12-26-2010, 04:15 PM
10. Shutter Island
I'm always willing to commend an established artist for venturing into unfamiliar territory when the familiar has done nothing but serve them well. Martin Scorsese reaches far beyond his usual fare with this mystery horror homage to Hitchcockian noir. Leo DiCaprio lays his [I]Departed accent on thick as Federal Marshal Teddy Daniels, ostensibly sent to a remote insane asylum to investigate the disappearance of a patient. As his investigation continues, he only seems to get further from the truth until the thrilling climax and heart-wrenching denouement. While the film took some flak for its Scooby Doo-styled reveals and half-baked David Lynch dream sequences, it's so much fun to follow its constant twists and turns that it's hard to hate it – besides, even the weak points can be chalked up to homage, as Hitchcock wasn't always the most well-rounded filmmaker himself.

5. Toy Story 3
No third movie in a series of animated pictures should, in theory, ever be the fifth best film of a given year. But theory doesn't account for the existence of Pixar, a veritable powerhouse of greatness at this point that has a remarkable masterpiece-to-crap ratio unmatched by any other studio, animated or otherwise. Toy Story 3 is very possibly their most complete film yet, flawlessly marrying the emotional depth of movies like Up and WALL-E with the rip-roaring adventure and comedy of lighter fare like Monsters, Inc. or its own prequels. An entire generation (mine) empathizes with Andy as he goes off to a future uncertain and, both literally and symbolically, leaves behind childish things. The incredibly moving scene at the landfill is likely 2010's best.

3. True Grit
It's often considered blasphemy to opine that a remake is better than an original, and that is especially the case in genre filmmaking, where fans cling to the old classics like a religion. Indeed, 1969's True Grit – the film that earned John Wayne his only Oscar – is a difficult movie to best, but the Coen Brothers are just the people to do it, and with this Jeff Bridges-starring throwback Western, they have absolutely done it. Their True Grit is the best film in the genre since 1992's Unforgiven, and it does what every great Western should do: It lets the camera do the talking. Yes, there are brilliant, verbose performances from Bridges, newcomer Hailee Steinfeld, Matt Damon, Josh Brolin, and others, but the Coens pull the camera back and let us drink in the rolling landscapes of the Old West and then zoom it back in to show us the craggy expressions of work-hardened men and women. This isn't mere Sergio Leone worship, though; the Brothers have their indelible stamp all over it, and it's bound to join the canon of their finest works.

1. Black Swan
And at long last, behold: the best film of 2010. Darren Aronofsky spent a decade revising and rewriting a script that was originally about a New York theater troupe to make it the best movie about the stage ever made. Set in the ultra-competitive world of professional ballet, company dancer Nina (Natalie Portman, in a role that finally shows her full potential as one of the greatest actresses of our time) is given the chance to be the prima ballerina in a production of Swan Lake. The pressure of the role, along with the unorthodox methods of her director (Vincent Cassel) and competition from a new company member (Mila Kunis) sends her spiraling into a mental breakdown that makes the audience question what is real and what isn't. Unlike Christopher Nolan, though, Aronofsky doesn't let us off the hook and tell us what to believe. Nothing is certain, and even multiple viewings can produce only theories, not conclusive truths. It's a brilliantly acted, brilliantly directed fusion of Mulholland Dr. and The Wrestler that brings with it countless layers of meaning and limitless potential for analysis, and it is without a doubt the finest movie of the year.

awesome reviews, all of those are in my top 10 as well

jhdeity
12-26-2010, 04:17 PM
Nice top 10, 4 of those(Inception,Kick-Ass,Toy Story 3, Black Swan) are in mine as well and Shutter Island is in my top 20. I'm dying to see True Grit, i've heard nothing but great things about it.

Shutter Island is still my #1 of 2010. I've never walked out of a movie theater and felt like that. That movie rocked me. I'm hoping Black Swan and True Grit are as good and I've heard. Inception is still my #2 but watching it a 2nd time confirmed how much more I liked Shutter island.

On a Top 50 note, M Night Shittymovie finally made a decent flick in 2010. It almost lost me but the last 15 min made it his best movie in a looong time.

DethMaiden
12-26-2010, 04:47 PM
Nice top 10, 4 of those(Inception,Kick-Ass,Toy Story 3, Black Swan) are in mine as well and Shutter Island is in my top 20. I'm dying to see True Grit, i've heard nothing but great things about it.

See it immediately. :allan:

awesome reviews, all of those are in my top 10 as well

Thanks! I'm curious to hear why Inception isn't on your list, since I'm sure you (and everyone on Earth) saw it.

Shutter Island is still my #1 of 2010. I've never walked out of a movie theater and felt like that. That movie rocked me. I'm hoping Black Swan and True Grit are as good and I've heard. Inception is still my #2 but watching it a 2nd time confirmed how much more I liked Shutter island.

On a Top 50 note, M Night Shittymovie finally made a decent flick in 2010. It almost lost me but the last 15 min made it his best movie in a looong time.

I was a little surprised Shutter Island sneaked into my top 10 to be honest. Coming out way back in February and thus being hazy in people's memories definitely worked against it; if I had seen it last night for the first time it might have been higher. Not fair, but that's how the brain works.

EDIT: What Shyamalan movie do you mean? The Last Airbender? Because even though I didn't see it it's been #1 on most worst of the year lists. :lol:

street_burial
12-26-2010, 04:55 PM
Thanks! I'm curious to hear why Inception isn't on your list, since I'm sure you (and everyone on Earth) saw it.

I thought there was too much hype around it. So i went and saw it opening day with very high expectations, and it was kind of disappointing. The acting in the movie is fantastic, the story is good, but it just wasn't as good as people made it out to be in my opinion. It wasn't necessarily played out like i thought it would be. It's in my top 15 just not top 10.

jhdeity
12-26-2010, 05:15 PM
Yeah i'll be first to admit I drank the kool aid on Shutter Island. I didn't even make the connection to The Departed but maybe that had something to do with it and why I was invested from jump. I questioned little things throughout the movie but was always 100% behind the Marshall and his plight. What an incredible journey that turned out to be both emotionally and mentally. I walked out of that theater on a natural high like I've never felt before. I wish I had a camera to see my face during the scene at the lake. That was more terrifying than any horror movie since The Shining to me and the fact that I never saw it coming made it one of the most incredible scenes in cinematic history to me. Ironically when I asked a good friend why she thought Inception was better she referenced that scene and how it almost runied the movie for her. Just goes to show how who we are affects how we view, interpret and enjoy things.

I almost wish I had seen Inception before Shutter Island because I had those same expectations and even though it was more intellectual, I never 100% became engulfed in Cobb's mind or plight. I was just an observer who was entertained, loves Ellen Page and thinks Joseph Gordon-Levitt eerily reminds me of Heath Ledger way too often. Basically I never drank the kool aid...

I'm thinking Black Swan is going to end up as my #2 but if somehow it shocks the world and tops Shutter Island for me it'll make my year.

larvtard
12-26-2010, 07:42 PM
:lol: My grandparents dragged us to "Little Fockers" today, and my dad and brother snuck off to see "Black Swan." Sounds like I should've joined them...

DethMaiden
12-26-2010, 07:51 PM
Yeah i'll be first to admit I drank the kool aid on Shutter Island. I didn't even make the connection to The Departed but maybe that had something to do with it and why I was invested from jump. I questioned little things throughout the movie but was always 100% behind the Marshall and his plight. What an incredible journey that turned out to be both emotionally and mentally. I walked out of that theater on a natural high like I've never felt before. I wish I had a camera to see my face during the scene at the lake. That was more terrifying than any horror movie since The Shining to me and the fact that I never saw it coming made it one of the most incredible scenes in cinematic history to me. Ironically when I asked a good friend why she thought Inception was better she referenced that scene and how it almost runied the movie for her. Just goes to show how who we are affects how we view, interpret and enjoy things.


I'm totally with you on that, actually. I completely bought into the entire thing and when Kingsley confronts Leo in the lighthouse my mind was fucking blown, even though the reveals were a little silly (letters rearranged on a blackboard? Thanks Marty). But I totally suspend my disbelief at the movies so twist endings, as long as they aren't totally moronic, always get me.

JRA
12-27-2010, 06:42 PM
3. True Grit
It's often considered blasphemy to opine that a remake is better than an original, and that is especially the case in genre filmmaking, where fans cling to the old classics like a religion. Indeed, 1969's True Grit – the film that earned John Wayne his only Oscar – is a difficult movie to best, but the Coen Brothers are just the people to do it, and with this Jeff Bridges-starring throwback Western, they have absolutely done it. Their True Grit is the best film in the genre since 1992's Unforgiven, and it does what every great Western should do: It lets the camera do the talking. Yes, there are brilliant, verbose performances from Bridges, newcomer Hailee Steinfeld, Matt Damon, Josh Brolin, and others, but the Coens pull the camera back and let us drink in the rolling landscapes of the Old West and then zoom it back in to show us the craggy expressions of work-hardened men and women. This isn't mere Sergio Leone worship, though; the Brothers have their indelible stamp all over it, and it's bound to join the canon of their finest works.

You liked this movie for the western montages? Are you fucking shitting me? If you want to see the old west so bad, buy a nature video or go hiking in the Arizona desert.

Anyways, I finally this movie tonight. While it was definitely good, it was NOT worth the hype. All I can say is I had to wait 90+ minutes for a climax that lasted less than 5? At least drag the girl to a hideout and do a "come at dawn or she's dead" trope followed by a duel of some kind. All in all, I've only seen two Coen Brothers movies: this and Big Lebowski. Lebowski is better, and I didn't understand what the hell was going on there.

DethMaiden
12-27-2010, 07:50 PM
I...I don't know how to address your honest to God opinions because they're so ignorant. Have you ever seen a Western before? And did you know True Grit is based on a book? And how did you not know what was going on in Lebowski? And just....what? :confused:

EDIT: Not to mention you totally misrepresented what I said.

EDIT 2: Why even set a Western in the West if the landscapes are immaterial?

DethMaiden
12-27-2010, 08:24 PM
Anyway, I'm bailing on giving individual awards. I think the movies list was sufficient. Gun to my head, Portman for Best Actress, Firth for Best Actor, no strong opinion on a supporting actress, Rush for Best Supporing Actor, Aronofsky for best director, True Grit for best cinematography, Social Network for Best Adapted Screenplay, no strong opinion on an original screenplay, and who cares about the rest.

EDIT: Black Swan deserves Best Score but it's ineligible because it contains variations on themes from "Swan Lake." Stupid rule.

JRA
12-27-2010, 08:29 PM
I never said the landscapes were immaterial, but if that's what makes or breaks a western, I think that's the wrong reason. I watch westerns to watch a time when men were men and the gun was the law of the land. Also, I think "let the camera do the talking" is an inaccurate assessment of the film, considering most of the time Bridges was rambling incoherently (which I don't mean as an insult, I really wanted to understand what he was saying as I'm sure there was some funny shit in there). When I think of letting the camera do the talking, I think of very little spoken lines in the film. Think the first 10 minutes or so of There Will be Blood.

and yes I did know True Grit was based on a book, what does that have to do with anything?

as for Lebowski, by "didn't know what the hell was going on," I meant it was hard to follow If you're gonna get up my ass about that too, I don't know what to tell you.

DethMaiden
12-27-2010, 08:35 PM
Well, I had a caveat to my statement by commending several of the performances, so I'm not writing off the characters. But have you seen any of Sergio Leone's movies, by chance? Those are quintessential Westerns to me, and they have plenty of incredibly wide shots of the landscape and incredibly close shots of craggy men. You're right about the nature of Westerns having manly men and the gun ruling the day, but there's plenty of awful Westerns that have that too. Really great cinematography is what sets the great ones apart. Again, if I just wanted the stories, I'd read a book or listen to a radio program.

I mention that it's a book because you wanted the Coens to change the ending, which would not be true to the source material. That's all.

Lebowski isn't hard to follow. ;)

JRA
12-27-2010, 08:39 PM
I didn't say I wanted them to change the ending, just to stretch out the suspense a little bit. I mean we see them search for Josh Brolin (forget the character's name) they give up hope, then Matty sees him in the river, then 5 minutes she shoots him dead off a cliff. If I had went to take a piss break after Matty shakes Matt Damon's hand I probably would have missed the climax.

DethMaiden
12-27-2010, 08:41 PM
Probably shouldn't take piss breaks at the movies. ;)

El Gordo
12-28-2010, 05:56 AM
You liked this movie for the western montages? Are you fucking shitting me? If you want to see the old west so bad, buy a nature video or go hiking in the Arizona desert.

Anyways, I finally this movie tonight. While it was definitely good, it was NOT worth the hype. All I can say is I had to wait 90+ minutes for a climax that lasted less than 5? At least drag the girl to a hideout and do a "come at dawn or she's dead" trope followed by a duel of some kind. All in all, I've only seen two Coen Brothers movies: this and Big Lebowski. Lebowski is better, and I didn't understand what the hell was going on there.

Dude, honestly you're missing out if you've only seen 2 Coen Bros. films. Fargo, Burn After Reading, No Country For Old Men, O Brother Where Art Thou are all great. Then again, if you didn't 'get' Lebowski I don't know if you should bother.

ravenheart
12-28-2010, 06:44 AM
Yeah that's the last thing I am, I just hate most horror movies.

Backing up a couple of pages, did you just attempt to defend an accusation of willful ignorance with a willfully ignorant statement?

You couldn't script this stuff :lol:

Maiden33
12-28-2010, 09:20 PM
Saw True Grit today. Absolutely loved it. Granted, I honestly don't see many new movies, so a ranking would be absolutely pointless. But I absolutely loved it.

DethMaiden
12-28-2010, 09:51 PM
Saw True Grit today. Absolutely loved it. Granted, I honestly don't see many new movies, so a ranking would be absolutely pointless. But I absolutely loved it.

:allan: Glad you liked it. 'Twas great.

Natrlhi
12-28-2010, 10:08 PM
Dude, honestly you're missing out if you've only seen 2 Coen Bros. films. Fargo, Burn After Reading, No Country For Old Men, O Brother Where Art Thou are all great. Then again, if you didn't 'get' Lebowski I don't know if you should bother.This.

Backing up a couple of pages, did you just attempt to defend an accusation of willful ignorance with a willfully ignorant statement?

You couldn't script this stuff :lol:...and this. :party: :rocker: :party:

Saw True Grit today. Absolutely loved it. Granted, I honestly don't see many new movies, so a ranking would be absolutely pointless. But I absolutely loved it.:agree: Me too.

It was actually a "double feature day" for me. I went with my wife to see Black Swan, and we kinda just forgot that we were supposed to leave the building after that. ;) :D

...and for the record, Black Swan was fucking awesome as well. :bowdown:

Natrlhi
12-28-2010, 10:15 PM
10. Shutter Island
9. Winter's Bone
8. Kick-Ass
7. The Kids Are All Right
6. The Girl With the Dragon Tattoo
5. Toy Story 3
4. The King's Speech
3. True Grit
2. Inception
1. Black Swan
So anyway, love your list. I didn't see "Kids", "Speech" or "Inception" yet, but I've no reason to believe any of them were less than very, very good. I also can't recall at the moment if I saw anything that I would have on my list that isn't on yours. Just wanted to say that I loved your 10-8, 6 & 5, 3 and especially your top pick. Portman did a fine job there. :fist:

DethMaiden
12-28-2010, 10:19 PM
Ah, you saw Winter's Bone and Dragon Tattoo! That's so awesome, I have fucking nobody to talk to about those except my brother who watched Dragon Tattoo with me. Both were phenomenal.

Is it just me or was this the best year for female performances ever? Portman, Mila Kunis, Noomi Rapace, Jennifer Lawrence, Julianne Moore, Annette Bening, Helena Bonham Carter, Hailee Steinfeld...hell, even Chloë Moretz. Not to mention several non-top ten performances that were great and some I didn't even see that are supposed to be. The dudes had NOTHIN' on the ladies this year.

Natrlhi
12-28-2010, 10:34 PM
Ah, you saw Winter's Bone and Dragon Tattoo! That's so awesome, I have fucking nobody to talk to about those except my brother who watched Dragon Tattoo with me. Both were phenomenal.

Is it just me or was this the best year for female performances ever? Portman, Mila Kunis, Noomi Rapace, Jennifer Lawrence, Julianne Moore, Annette Bening, Helena Bonham Carter, Hailee Steinfeld...hell, even Chloë Moretz. Not to mention several non-top ten performances that were great and some I didn't even see that are supposed to be. The dudes had NOTHIN' on the ladies this year.I did see both, and your reviews are excellent. "Winter's Bone" was a really bleak film, and I loved it - it reminded me of other great films such as "Snow Angels", "Frozen River" and "Undertow" (all excellent). "Dragon Tattoo" was disturbing on many levels, and I loved it as well. It got under my skin in much the same way as "Let the Right One In" - another great film.

...and yeah, it was one hell of a year for actors of the fairer sex. :fist:

powerslave_85
12-28-2010, 11:55 PM
Is it just me or was this the best year for female performances ever? Portman, Mila Kunis, Noomi Rapace, Jennifer Lawrence, Julianne Moore, Annette Bening, Helena Bonham Carter, Hailee Steinfeld...hell, even Chloë Moretz. Not to mention several non-top ten performances that were great and some I didn't even see that are supposed to be. The dudes had NOTHIN' on the ladies this year.

Her roles this year weren't quite award-caliber, but I think Chloe Moretz definitely gets the breakout star title for this year, IMO. She's going to be huge if she gets good parts from here on out.

I haven't seen any of the other actresses you mentioned yet (I plan on seeing Winter's Bone in the near future), but it would be a damned shame if Hailee Steinfeld didn't win something for True Grit. She was outstanding. Speaking of which, I'm wondering if that would be considered a lead or supporting role. You could probably make the case for both.

I found out that Exit Through The Gift Shop is streaming on Netflix Instant, so I'll probably watch that this weekend.